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Tools & Resources28909/18/2020 4:40:20 AMTools & ResourcesTools & Resources9/21/2020 9:19:04 AM82793https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/enhtmlTrueaspx
Canadian Patient Safety Week (CPSW)3223General Patient SafetyEvents12/8/2009 9:50:43 PM The theme for this year’s Canadian Patient Safety Week will be announced soon. The campaign will be hosted on the new Healthcare Excellence Canada website. Check it out Below are details from the 2020 Canadian Patient Safety Week campaign. Virtual Care is New to Us #ConquerSilence Thank you to everyone who participated in Canadian Patient Safety Week from October 26 to 30, 2020. Let’s Keep the Momentum Going The theme of Canadian Patient Safety Week 2020 was Virtual Care is New to Us. Only 10% of Canadians have experience with virtual care1, but 41% would like to have virtual visits with their healthcare providers2. The way to ensure that healthcare providers and patients make the most of virtual appointments is to use tried and true basics – encourage patients to ask questions and to bring an advocate with them to appointments. Although Canadian Patient Safety Week 2020 has passed, virtual care is here to stay! Please continue to access and share the virtual care resources below.Virtual Care Resources – ConquerSilence.ca Access valuable resources for you, your colleagues, and your patients to improve virtual care appointments. We worked with the Canadian Medical Association to develop a WEBside manner infographic for healthcare providers, plus two virtual care checklists and a how to make the most of your virtual visit infographic for patients. Access Now PATIENT Podcast Series Listen to season 4 of our award-winning PATIENT podcast! Listen Here Are your patients ready for Virtual care? Share our free online quiz with your patients Virtual care Quiz About Canadian Patient Safety Week is a national, annual campaign that started in 2005 to inspire extraordinary improvement in patient safety and quality. As the momentum for promoting best practices in patient safety has grown, so has the participation in Canadian Patient Safety Week. Canadian Patient Safety week is relevant to anyone who engages with our healthcare system providers, patients, and citizens. Working together, thousands help spread the message to Conquer Silence. Partners Sponsorship If your organization is interested in sponsoring a portion of CPSW 2020, please contact sponsorshipsmail@cpsi-icsp.ca. We have many opportunities available. Virtual Care Definition Virtual care has been defined as any interaction between patients and/or members of their circle of care, occurring remotely, using any forms of communication or information technologies with the aim of facilitating or maximizing the quality and effectiveness of patient care. (CMA definition) Do you have any questions or suggestions? Contact CPSI Communications Email CPSW@cpsi-icsp.ca Join the conversation at #ConquerSilence 1https//www.cma.ca/sites/default/files/pdf/virtual-care/ReportoftheVirtualCareTaskForce.pdf 2https//www.cma.ca/sites/default/files/pdf/virtual-care/ReportoftheVirtualCareTaskForce.pdf; https//actt.albertadoctors.org/file/VirtualVisitsLitSummary2020.pdf Canadian Patient Safety WeekCanadian Patient Safety Week (CPSW)9/10/2021 8:53:37 PM129660https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/EventshtmlTrueaspx
Clean Your Hands Day3225Infection Prevention & Control (IPAC)Events6/3/2015 4:46:05 PM Visit Clean Your Hands Day new home page on the Healthcare Excellence Canada website. Check it out Clean Your Hands DayVisit Clean Your Hands Day new home page on the Healthcare Excellence Canada website. Check it out5/14/2021 3:20:35 PM97408https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/EventshtmlTrueaspx
Enhanced Recovery Canada™ - Enhanced Recovery After Surgery3122Surgical Care Safety;General Patient SafetySocial Media/Social Share7/13/2016 2:57:58 AM What is Enhanced Recovery After Surgery? Enhanced Recovery Canada is a project of the Canadian Patient Safety Institute leading the drive to improve surgical safety across the country and is based on Enhanced Recovery After Surgery – ERAS surgical best practices. These evidence-based principles support better outcomes for surgical patients including an improved patient experience, reduced length of stay, decreased complication rates and fewer hospital readmissions. In partnership with Enhanced Recovery Canada endorses six core ERAS principles to shift the surgical care paradigm Patient and family engagement Nutrition management Perioperative fluid and hydration management Multi-modal opioid sparing analgesia Perioperative best practices Mobilization Anesthetic Challenges to Achieve Same Day Discharge Hip & Knee Arthroplasty Resources for Colorectal Surgeries Resources for Gynaecological Surgeries Resources for Orthopaedic Hip and Knee Replacement Surgeries Industry Partners Enhanced Recovery Canada™ gratefully acknowledges the support from the following industry partners in the development of ERC tools and resources and contributing to the dissemination and implementation of these surgical best practices. The ERC Pathways and other resources have been developed based exclusively on unbiased clinical evidence. Gold Level Silver Level Bronze Level For more information, contact us at info@cpsi-icsp.ca. Enhanced Recovery Canada™What is Enhanced Recovery After Surgery ? Enhanced Recovery Canada is a project of the Canadian Patient Safety Institute leading the drive7/29/2021 7:06:08 PM36950https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Hand Hygiene Fact Sheets3120Infection Prevention & Control (IPAC)Toolkits & Guides;Tip Sheets4/1/2020 2:15:32 PMVisit the new home for hand hygiene resources on the Healthcare Excellence Canada website. Check it out Hand Hygiene Fact SheetsVisit the new home for hand hygiene resources on the Healthcare Excellence Canada website. Check it out5/14/2021 3:21:23 PM20213https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Advocacy and support for use of a Surgical Safety Checklist3070Surgical Care SafetyPosition Statements2/5/2019 7:55:32 PMPosition StatementA Surgical Safety Checklist is smart for patients and smart for providers. It's use in Canadian healthcare facilities is endorsed by a Position Statement supported by many surgical interest groups. ​Healthcare professionals must make every reasonable effort to provide safe care to their patients. The purpose of this statement is to express the commitment of the undersigned organizations to prioritize perioperative patient safety by creating an environment conducive to the effective adoption and use of a Surgical Safety Checklist. Download Advocacy and support for use of a Surgical Safety ChecklistPosition Statement A Surgical Safety Checklist is smart for patients and smart for providers. It's use in Canadian healthcare facilities9/24/2020 8:13:01 AM3060https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Atlantic Learning Exchange3228General Patient SafetyEvents9/20/2016 6:01:00 PM Discover innovative and emerging trends in patient safety & quality improvement October 8 – 9, 2019 St. John's, NL, The Atlantic Health Quality and Patient Safety Collaborative (AHQPSC), through partnership support of the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI), welcomes you to attend this year's Atlantic Health Quality & Patient Safety Learning Exchange (ALE 2019) which will take place at the Sheraton Hotel Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, October 8 – 9, 2019. Program Who should attend? We look forward to welcoming innovative and engaged care providers, managers, health leaders, academics and students from university and college setting, as well as government representatives from the four Atlantic Provinces in attendance this year. Tickets are limited! Through this conference, you will be given an opportunity to Mobilize energy and enthusiasm for a new era of patient safety and quality improvement; Understand the role innovation and technology play in healthcare improvement; Stimulate change through the power of the patient voice; and Develop the skills for leading transformational change! Program Partners Sponsors Do you want to support this event? Do you want exclusive access to the front line of healthcare in the Atlantic provinces? We are looking for Sponsors and Exhibitors contact Gina Peck at 902-481-5034 or gpeck@cpsi-icsp.ca to receive more information on sponsorship and exhibiting at the conference. Atlantic Quality and Patient Safety Learning ExchangeDiscover innovative and emerging trends in patient safety & quality improvement October 8 – 9, 2019 St. John's, NL, The Atlantic Health10/29/2020 9:25:42 PM14508https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/EventshtmlTrueaspx
Education to support mandatory ADR and MDI reporting (Vanessa’s Law)3110General Patient Safety;Government Relations;Healthcare HarmReports & Publications;Patient and Family Resource;Toolkits & Guides3/4/2019 9:27:01 PM The Protecting Canadians from Unsafe Drugs Act, also known as Vanessa's Law, is intended to increase drug and medical device safety in Canada by strengthening Health Canada's ability to collect information and to take quick and appropriate action when a serious health risk is identified. As of December 16, 2019, it became mandatory for hospitals to report serious adverse drug reactions (serious ADRs) and medical device incidents (MDIs) to Health Canada. Downloadable from this webpage are 4 PowerPoint modules developed in collaboration with Health Canada. These modules contain core content intended for use by hospitals, health care professionals, patients and their families, and educators, to explain, describe, or promote the reporting of serious ADRs and MDIs. Module 1 – Overview of Vanessa's Law and Reporting Requirements PowerPoint - Module 1 Module 2 – Reporting Processes to Health Canada PowerPoint - Module 2 Module 3 – Strategies to Promote and Support Mandatory Reporting PowerPoint - Module 3 Module 4 – Health Canada's Review and Communication of Safety Findings PowerPoint - Module 4 These materials (as entire modules or as individual slides or selected content) can be used for individual learning or incorporated into presentations, orientation, continuing education, and other information-sharing activities. The materials can be used in the following ways to support and raise awareness of mandatory reporting requirements Hospitals can include some or all of the content in their local, regional, and/or provincial information-sharing activities (e.g., "Lunch and Learn" sessions, presentations, orientation programs for new staff). Educators in the health care sector can use the content in presentations or as part of a curriculum. Professional associations, societies, and regulatory colleges, as well as other training institutions for health care workers, may incorporate the content of the modules into accredited courses or continuing education certification programs. Patient and consumer organizations can help disseminate some or all of the information in the modules to increase awareness and knowledge among their members. If you have questions about how to use these educational materials for your specific audience (e.g., selecting slides or content from several modules to create a customized presentation), please contact ISMP Canada info@ismpcanada.ca HSO https//healthstandards.org/ CPSI info@cpsi-icsp.ca ​If you have questions about Vanessa's Law and the mandatory reporting requirements, please contact hc.canada.vigilance.sc@canada.ca. This conceptual model of serious ADR and MDI reporting by hospitals depicts the information provided in the 4 PowerPoint modules mandatory reporting requirements, reporting processes to Health Canada, strategies to promote and support reporting, and Health Canada’s review and communication of safety findings. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Health Canada, ISMP Canada, HSO, and CPSI gratefully acknowledge input received from the Advisory Panel (listed in alphabetical order) Glenn Cox, Senior Director Pharmacy Services NSHA, Director Pharmacy Services, Cape Breton/Antigonish/Guysborough, Cape Breton Regional Hospital, Sydney, NS ; Michael Gaucher, Director Pharmaceuticals & Health Workforce Information Services, Canadian Institute for Health Information, Ottawa, ON ; Andrew Ibey – Clinical Engineer, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, ON ; Denis Lebel – Pharmacien, adjoint aux soins, enseignement et recherche, Département de pharmacie, CHU Sainte-Justine, QC ; Dr. Joel Lexchin, Professor Emeritus, School of Health Policy & Management, York University, Toronto, ON ; Faith Louis, Regional Manager, Quality Improvement & Support Services, Pharmacy Services, Horizon Health Network, NB; Holly Meyer, Provincial Director, Product Quality & Safety, Alberta Health Services, AB ; Maryann V. Murray, Patients for Patient Safety Canada; Tolu Oyebode, Government of Saskatchewan, Senior Project Manager, Patient Safety Unit, Strategic Priorities Branch, Ministry of Health, SK ; Sheryl Peterson, Associate Director, Lecturer, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of British Columbia (Vancouver Campus); Michelle Rossi, Director, Policy and Strategy, Health Quality Ontario, Toronto, ON ; Myrella Roy, Executive Director, and Cathy Lyder, Director Professional Practice, Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists, Ottawa, ON ; Christelle Sessua, Quality Assurance-Risk Management Coordinator, Iqaluit Health Services, Department of Health, Government of Nunavut ; Robyn Tamblyn, James McGill Chair, Professor, Department of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, McGill University, Scientific Director, Institute of Health Services and Policy Research, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Montreal, QC ; Annemarie Taylor, Executive Director, Patient Safety & Learning System, Vancouver, British Columbia ; Terence Young, Chair of Drug Safety Canada and father of Vanessa Young. Educational Support for Mandatory Reporting of Serious ADRs and MDIs by HospitalsThe Protecting Canadians from Unsafe Drugs Act, also known as Vanessa's Law, is intended to9/24/2020 8:13:31 AM169480https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
A Guide to Patient Safety Improvement3077General Patient SafetyToolkits & Guides7/29/2020 5:15:14 PM When it comes to patient safety, a substantial body of evidence exists to demonstrate interventions (leading practices and processes) that lead to improved patient outcomes for numerous healthcare conditions. Despite available evidence, practice changes are not implemented consistently and effectively to support organizations and teams to address patient safety challenges. This resource has been designed to support teams across all healthcare sectors in using a Knowledge Translation and Quality Improvement integrated approach to change that will impact patient safety outcomes. This Guide for Patient Safety Improvement is intended to accompany current best available evidence change ideas, and tools and resources for your specific project. It includes ideal practice changes “the what” and strategies “the how” that creates the evidence-based intervention. Adaptations are expected and important considerations for implementation will be provided in this guide. Download A Guide to Patient Safety ImprovementWhen it comes to patient safety, a substantial body of evidence exists to demonstrate interventions (leading practices and processes) that lead to10/15/2020 7:33:09 PM10195https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
A Framework for Establishing a Patient Safety Culture3094General Patient Safety;Healthcare Harm;Improving CultureFrameworks2/14/2018 4:54:19 PMPatient Safety Culture "Bundle" for CEOs/Senior Leaders What is the Patient Safety Culture "Bundle"? Strengthening a safety culture necessitates interventions that simultaneously enable, enact and elaborate in a way that is attuned to the existing culture. Through a literature review of more than 60 resources, a Patient Safety Culture Bundle has been created and validated through interviews with Canadian thought leaders. The Bundle is based on a set of evidence-based practices that must all be applied in order to deliver good care. All components are required to improve the patient safety culture. The Patient Safety Culture "Bundle" for CEOs and Senior Leaders encompasses key concepts of safety science, implementation science, just culture, psychological safety, staff safety/health, patient and family engagement, disruptive behavior, high reliability/resilience, patient safety measurement, frontline leadership, physician leadership, staff engagement, teamwork/communication, and industry-wide standardization/alignment. Download a one-pager of the Patient Safety Culture Bundle for CEOs/Senior Leaders Why was this Bundle created? A patient safety culture is difficult to operationalize. Improving safety requires an organizational culture that enables and prioritizes patient safety. The importance of culture change needs to be brought to the forefront, rather than taking a backseat to other safety activities. The National Patient Safety Consortium Education Working Group verified the critical role senior leadership plays in ensuring patient safety is an organizational priority. A Working group of partners, led by the Canadian Patient Safety Institute, Canadian College of Health Leaders (CCHL), HealthCareCAN and the Healthcare Insurance Reciprocal of Canada (HIROC) were brought together to establish a framework and advance this work. How can I use the Patient Safety Culture Bundle? The key components required for a Patient Safety Culture are identified under three pillars ENABLING ENACTING LEARNING Within each pillar you will find links to valuable tools and resources to help your efforts in establishing and sustaining a patient safety culture. (coming soon)Are you looking to establish and sustain a culture of safety? We are committed to providing a robust framework to advance a safety culture. The Bundle is a dynamic tool that will be continually updated. We invite you to check back often for more links and resources. We also need your participation and input to ensure the Bundle is current and relevant. Please forward any links or comments to info@cpsi-icsp.ca. Testimonials "Patient safety and healthcare quality are advanced when boards and senior leaders are committed to it and are able to show evidence of that commitment. Missing until now is a concise "how to" guide. The Patient Safety bundle for Leaders fills that gap." Catherine Gaulton, CEO, HIROC "Leadership is critical to developing a patient safety culture and building leadership capacity requires a vision of the knowledge, skills and behaviours necessary to achieve this. The Patient Safety Leadership Bundle provides this and will be a practical tool for health leaders across the healthcare continuum to assess their personal capabilities. It will also provide both organizations and the system, as a whole, a checklist for what's missing from our collective leadership education toolkits so that we can strategically respond to these needs. HealthCareCAN is committed to the spread of this tool across the country as part of a cultural shift to safety and a drive towards high-reliability culture." Dale Schierbeck, Vice-President, Learning & Development, HealthCareCAN and Co-Chair, Patient Safety Education for Leaders Working A Framework for Establishing a Patient Safety CulturePatient Safety Culture "Bundle" for CEOs/Senior Leaders What is the Patient Safety Culture "Bundle"? Strengthening a safety9/24/2020 8:12:57 AM16940https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Creating a Safe Space: Addressing the Psychological Safety of Healthcare Workers3086General Patient Safety;Psychological Safety for Healthcare WorkersToolkits & Guides;Healthcare provider stories;Reports & Publications1/6/2020 4:59:11 PM Cumulative stress, compassion fatigue and trauma due to experiences with patient safety incidents impact the mental wellness of our healthcare providers. These factors contribute to inadvertent patient care errors, mental health issues and attrition which compromise patient safety. A peer support program and other support models not only simply helps healthcare workers with their experiences with patient safety incidents but also improves the system and help make patient care safe. The Creating a Safe Space Addressing the Psychological Safety of Healthcare Workers manuscript and the Canadian Peer Support Network are intended to assist healthcare organizations support healthcare workers by creating peer-to-peer support programs (PSPs) or other models of supports to improve the emotional well-being of healthcare workers and allow them to provide the best and safest care to their patients. The Creating a Safe Space Addressing the Psychological Safety of Healthcare Workers manuscript provides a comprehensive overview of what healthcare worker support models are available in Canada and internationally. The Manuscript outlines best practice guidelines, tools, and resources that policy makers, accreditation bodies, regulators and healthcare leaders can use to assess the support needs of healthcare workers. The Canadian Peer Support Network is intended as a forum for healthcare organizations seeking guidance in the development of their Peer Support Programs to assist providers who have experienced a patient safety incident. Download Disclaimer The Canadian Peer Support Network is not intended as therapeutic support between, or amongst, members It is for informational purposes only. Creating a Safe Space: Psychological Safety of Healthcare Workers (Peer to Peer Support and Other Support Models)Cumulative stress, compassion fatigue and trauma due to experiences with patient safety incidents impact the mental wellness of our healthcare12/1/2020 4:47:37 PM13178https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
S.A.F.E. Toolkit Video Series6762Community Based Care;General Patient Safety;Improving Medication Safety;Surgical Care SafetyReports & Publications;Toolkits & Guides;Social Media/Social Share8/2/2017 3:58:40 PM Understanding that the healthcare system is complex and intimidating, the Manitoba Institute for Patient Safety created the Self Advocacy For Everyone (S. A. F. E) Toolkit to provide tips and resources to ease the minds of those who want to properly speak up about how they feel when it comes to healthcare. To bolster the toolkit, the Manitoba Institute for Patient Safety has created and is pleased to share their new, leading-edge resource. Establishing new ways to encourage people to be more involved in discussions about healthcare is challenging. Therefore, MIPS has come up with the S.A.F.E Toolkit Video series. Based off topics covered in their S.A.F.E Toolkit, the DVD's are made up of eight short three to five minute videos that are supplement the toolkit, and will include the "5 Questions" resource in three of the videos. These videos can be viewed by going to the websites listed below or by accessing YouTube Learn More The S.A.F.E Toolkit Series Playlist We strongly encourage patients, their families and healthcare providers share these resources. Understanding that the healthcare system is complex and intimidating, the Manitoba Institute for Patient Safety created the Self9/24/2020 8:12:42 AM3109https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Pages/Forms/NewDefaultView.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Introduction of the Measuring and Monitoring of Safety (Vincent) Framework to Canada6736General Patient SafetyEvents;Webinars;Toolkits & Guides1/4/2017 4:11:25 PM Archive Monday, January 30, 2017 at 1000 am MST / 1200 pm EST Purpose of the Call "…if I apply this [framework] conceptually to any problem I've got in safety I can make it work, and it orders my thinking" – Neil Prentice, Assistant Medical Director Mental Health, Tayside Trust, Scotland In Canada, as in the UK and US the focus of governments on assessing both quality and safety has increased over the past 10 years.[1],[2] A very large number of quality outcomes have been specified but the approach to safety has been much narrower, leaving many aspects of safety unexplored.[3] The measurement of harm, so important in the evolution of patient safety, has been largely neglected[4] and there have been prominent calls for improved measures.[5] There is a critical need for patient safety measurement at the front lines, so that clinical teams can focus on key problems. Don Berwick has stated that 'most health care organisations at present have very little capacity to analyse, monitor, or learn from safety and quality information. This gap is costly and should be closed. Early warning signals can be valued and should be maintained and heeded'.5,[7] In 2013 Professors Charles Vincent, Susan Burnett and Jane Carthey published their report The Measuring and Monitoring of Safety[8] which describes their framework to be implemented in practice to close the gap identified by Berwick. The framework provides a broader view of the information needed to create and sustain safer care. Objectives Introduce the Measuring and Monitoring of Safety Framework to a Canadian healthcare audience Describe how the framework would work in CanadaResources Download A framework for measuring and monitoring safety A practical guide to using a new framework for measuring and monitoring safety in the NHS (2014) - Download the guide from The Health Foundation The measurement and monitoring of safety Drawing together academic evidence and practical experience to produce a framework for safety measurement and monitoring (2013) – Download the full report from The Health Foundation Speaker Biographies Professor Charles Vincent Professor Charles Vincent is trained as a clinical psychologist and has worked in the British NHS for several years. Since 1985 he has focused on conducting research on the causes of harm to patients, the consequences for patients and staff and methods of improving the safety of healthcare. He established the Clinical Risk Unit at the Department of Psychology, University College London where he was Professor of Psychology. In 2002 he moved to become Professor of Clinical Safety Research in the Department of Surgery and Cancer at Imperial College in 2002. From 1999 to 2003 he was a Commissioner on the UK Commission for Health Improvement. He has acted as an advisor on patient safety in many inquiries and committees including the Bristol Inquiry, the Parliamentary Health Select Committee, the Francis Inquiry and the Berwick Review. From 2007 to 2013 he was the Director of the National Institute of Health Research Centre for Patient Safety & Service Quality at Imperial College. He moved to the Department of Experimental Psychology in January 2014 with the support of the Health Foundation to continue his work on safety in healthcare. G. Ross Baker, Ph.D. G. Ross Baker, Ph.D., is a professor in the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto and Director of the MSc. Program in Quality Improvement and Patient Safety. Ross is co-lead for a large quality improvement-training program in Ontario, IDEAS (improving and Driving Excellence Across Sectors). Recent research projects include a review and synthesis of evidence on factors linked to high performing healthcare systems, an analysis of why progress on patient safety has been slower than expected and an edited book of case studies on patient engagement strategies. Chris Power What began as a desire to help those in need 30 years ago has evolved into a mission to improve the quality of healthcare for all Canadians. Chris Power's journey in healthcare began at the bedside as a front-line nurse. Since then, she has grown into one of the preeminent healthcare executives in Canada. Her experiences, her success, and her values have led her to the position of CEO of the Canadian Patient Safety Institute. Previously, Chris served for eight years as president and CEO of Capital Health, Nova Scotia, with an annual operating budget of approximately $900 million, and 12,000 staff. Under Chris’s leadership Capital Health achieved Accreditation with Exemplary Status in 2014 with recognition for 10 Leading Practices.​ SHIFT to Safety Ensuring patients are safe remains a major challenge for Canadian healthcare organisations and systems. The Canadian Patient Safety Institute's (CPSI) new initiative, SHIFT to Safety, has been launched to address these challenges, including helping providers and leaders improve their measurement efforts. References [1] Baker, G Ross, Beyond the quick fix – Strategies for improving patient safety. Institute of Health Policy Management and Evaluation. Nov.9.2015 [2] Darzi A. High quality care for all. London Department of Health, 2009. [3] Quality and Outcomes Framework 2013/14. London Department of Health, 2013. [4] Vincent CA, Aylin P, Franklin BD, et al. Is health care getting safer? BMJ 2008;3371205–07. [5] Francis R. Independent Inquiry into care provided by Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust January 2005–March 2009. London Department of Health, 2013. [6] Jha A, Pronovost P. Toward a safer health care system The critical need to improve measurement. JAMA. 2016. [7] Berwick DM. A promise to learn—a commitment to act. Improving the safety of patients in England. London Department of Health, 2013 [8] Vincent CA, Burnett S, Carthey C. The measurement and monitoring of safety in healthcare. London Health Foundation, 2013 Archive: Monday, January 30, 2017 at 10:00 am MST / 12:00 pm EST Purpose of the Call: "…if I apply this11/6/2020 9:11:21 PM8375https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Pages/Forms/NewDefaultView.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Infection Prevention and Control (IPAC): Getting Started Kit6746Infection Prevention & Control (IPAC);Surgical Care SafetyToolkits & Guides7/1/2015 8:55:35 AMEffective March 14 2019, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute has archived the Infection Prevention and Control (IPAC) intervention. Though you may continue to access the Getting Started Kit online, it will no longer be updated. ​​​ Getting Started Kit This free resource is designed to help you successfully implement interventions in your organization. The Getting Started Kit contains clinical information, information on the science of improvement, and everything you need to know to start using the intervention. Click here to download the NACS Getting Started Kit. ​ One-Pager The One-Pager is a summary of the Getting Started Kit that you can use to promote the intervention to your organization. Click here to download the One-Pager.​​ Icons​​ Intervention IconsUse these intervention icons on presentations, reports, flyers, and other material to promote the intervention throughout your organization. Click here to download the full-colour intervention icon. Click here to download the black and white intervention icon. NACS: Getting Started Kit9/24/2020 8:10:44 AM9713https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Pages/Forms/NewDefaultView.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Home Care Safety3067Community Based Care;General Patient Safety;Improving Medication Safety;Healthcare HarmReports & Publications;Toolkits & Guides6/5/2014 8:48:12 PM With the release of the Safety at Home A Pan- Canadian Home Care Study (2013), the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) and the Canadian Home Care Association (CHCA) worked with the research team to translate the knowledge acquired from the study into tools, resources and programs for the field. Click on the following links to access resources available to home care providers, clients and families, and policy makers. Resources for home care providers Resources for family caregivers and clients Resources for policy makers and academics​ Home Care SafetyWith the release of the Safety at Home: A Pan- Canadian Home Care Study (2013) , the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) and the9/24/2020 8:14:05 AM7089https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Improvement Frameworks Getting Started Kit3068General Patient Safety;Healthcare HarmToolkits & Guides;Frameworks11/24/2011 4:21:24 PM12/2/2015 7:00:00 AM​​​​The Improvement Frameworks Getting Started Kit is intended to serve as a common document appended to the Safer Healthcare Now! Getting Started Kits. The goal is to help provide a consistent way for teams and individuals to approach the challenge of making changes that result in improvements. Download Improvement Frameworks Getting Started KitThe Improvement Frameworks Getting Started Kit is intended to serve as a common document appended to the Safer Healthcare Now! Getting Started9/24/2020 8:14:36 AM11812https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Patient Safety and Incident Management Toolkit3069General Patient Safety;Improving Medication Safety;Healthcare HarmToolkits & Guides12/18/2014 8:28:40 PMPrevent Patient Safety Incidents and Minimize Harm When They Do Occur When a patient's safety is compromised, or even if someone just comes close to having an incident, you need to know you are taking the right measures to address it, now and in the future. CPSI provides you with practical strategies and resources to manage incidents effectively and keep your patients safe. This integrated toolkit considers the needs and concerns of patients and their families, and how to properly engage them throughout the process. Drawn from the best available evidence and expert advice, this newly designed toolkit is for those responsible for managing patient safety, quality improvement, risk management, and staff training in any healthcare setting. Patient Safety Management Incident Management System Factors For more information, contact us at info@cpsi-icsp.ca.Toolkit Focus and Components The toolkit focuses on patient safety and incident management; it touches on ideas and resources for exploring the broader aspects of quality improvement and risk management. There are three sections to the toolkit Incident management—the actions that follow patient safety incidents (including near misses) Patient safety management—the actions that help to proactively anticipate patient safety incidents and prevent them from occurring System factors—the factors that shape and are shaped by patient safety and incident management (legislation, policies, culture, people, processes and resources). Visual representation of the toolkit. Incident management Resources to guide the immediate and ongoing actions following a patient safety incident (including near misses). We emphasize immediate response, disclosure, how to prepare for analysis, the analysis process, follow-through, how to close the loop and share learning. Patient safety management Resources to guide action before the incident (e.g., plan, anticipate, and monitor to respond to expected and unexpected safety issues) so care is safer today and in the future. We promote a patient safety culture and reporting and learning system. System factors Understanding the factors that shape both patient safety and incident management and identify actions to respond, align, and leverage them is crucial to patient safety. The factors come from different system levels (inside and outside the organization) and include legislation, policies, culture, people, processes and resources.Implementing Patient Safety and Incident Management Processes Consider the following guiding principles when applying the practical strategies and resources. Patient- and family-centred care. The patient and family are at the centre of all patient safety and incident management activities. Engage with patients and families throughout their care processes, as they are an equal partner and essential to the design, implementation, and evaluation of care and services. Safety culture. Culture refers to shared values (what is important) and beliefs (what is held to be true) that interact with a system's structures and control mechanisms to produce behavioural norms. An organization with a safety culture avoids, prevents, and mitigates patient safety risks at all levels. This includes a reporting and learning culture. System perspective. Keep patients safe by understanding and addressing the factors that contribute to an incident at all system levels, redesigning systems, and applying human factor principles. Develop the capability and capacity for effectively assessing the complex system to accurately identify weaknesses and strengths for preventing future incidents. Shared responsibilities. Teamwork is necessary for safe patient care, particularly at transitions in care. It is the best defence against system failures and should be actively fostered by all team members, including patients and families. In a functional teamwork environment, everyone is valued, empowered, and responsible for taking action to prevent patient safety incidents, including speaking up when they see practices that endanger safety.Resources to Support Patient Safety and Incident Management CPSI's toolkit resources are practical tools for patient safety and incident management, compiled with input from experts and contributing organizations. You may not require all of them when managing an incident, so please use your discretion in selecting the tools most appropriate for your needs.Toolkit Development and Maintenance CPSI accessed a variety of qualified experts and organizations to compile this practical and evidence-based toolkit. The process included Assigning a CPSI team with support from a writer with experience in the field Seeking advice from an expert faculty that included patient and family representatives Basing the content on the Canadian Incident Analysis Framework Engaging key stakeholders via focus groups and collecting evidence from peer-reviewed journals and publicly available literature The toolkit will be updated every year to keep it relevant. We welcome feedback on what is helpful, what can be improved, and content enhancements at info@cpsi-icsp.ca.Patient Safety and Incident Management ToolkitPrevent Patient Safety Incidents and Minimize Harm When They Do Occur When a patient's safety is compromised, or even if someone just comes close to10/8/2020 7:03:53 PM26173https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
The Canadian Surgical Site Infection Prevention Audit - Results 3071Surgical Care Safety;Infection Prevention & Control (IPAC)Events;Webinars;Reports & Publications8/31/2015 5:35:10 PM Surgical site infection is the most common healthcare associated infection among surgical patients, with 77 per cent of patient deaths reported to be related to infection. In February 2016, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) along with our partners Alberta Health Services-Surgery Strategic Clinical Network, Atlantic Health Quality & Patient Safety Collaborative, BC Patient Safety & Quality Council, Health Quality Ontario, and Saskatchewan Ministry of Health- Patient Safety Unit, conducted the Canadian Surgical Site Infection (SSI) Prevention Audit. Download Auditing helps to identify both areas of excellence and areas for improvement. During the month of February, all acute care organizations providing surgical services were challenged to audit their established processes for preventing surgical site infections (SSI). 52 service areas participated in the Surgical Site Infection Prevention Audit with 1.998 patient charts audited. Audit highlights noted that 91% of patients received appropriate prophylactic antibiotics and 96% of patients received the appropriate method of pre-operative hair removal whereas post-operative glucose control was identified as an area requiring improvement. To learn more about the Canadian Surgical Site Infection Prevention Audit and Results Click here for information regarding Audit Methodology Access the National Call Results from Canadian SSI Prevention Audit; March 24th, 2016 View the Canadian Surgical Site Infection Prevention Audit Recap Report Audit Recap Report The Canadian Surgical Site Infection Prevention Audit - Results Surgical site infection is the most common healthcare associated infection among surgical patients, with 77 per cent of patient deaths reported to be9/24/2020 8:16:44 AM3254https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
The Safety Competencies Framework3072General Patient Safety;Healthcare HarmReports & Publications;Frameworks4/14/2009 11:53:32 PMSafety Competencies Framework Educating healthcare providers about patient safety and enabling them to use the tools and knowledge to build and maintain a safe system is fundamental to creating a culture of safety across the spectrum of care. The 2020 Safety Competencies Framework (2nd Edition) is a simple, powerful and flexible framework that includes enabling competencies that can be adopted and adapted by diverse healthcare programs to design curricula to teach safety and quality for any sector or healthcare program. It can also be a valuable resource to policy makers, regulators and accreditors to guide system change. The Six Domains support moving patient safety evidence into action and has strengthened its content with advancements in collective knowledge that include patient/family partnership, leadership, quality improvement and cultural competency concepts. Safety Competencies Framework Domains Domain 1 Patient Safety Culture Patient safety culture improvement involves recognizing the importance of ongoing collaboration and the commitment to advocate for change. Domain 2 Teamwork High-performing interprofessional teams demonstrate capabilities and competencies that are essential to efficient, effective, and safe collaborative practice. Domain 3 Communication Effective communication is beneficial to patients and healthcare providers, builds trust, and is a precondition of obtaining patient consent. Domain 4 Safety, Risk, and Quality Improvement Healthcare providers collect and monitor performance data to assess risk and improve outcomes. Domain 5 Optimize Human and System Factors Optimizing the human and environmental factors that support the achievement of best human performance is an essential safety competency for all healthcare providers. Domain 6 Recognize, Respond to and Disclose Patient Safety Incidents Open, honest, and empathetic disclosure and appropriate apologies benefit patients and families, health providers, and their organizations. The Safety CompetenciesThe Safety Competencies: Message from the CEO12/3/2020 4:19:06 PM58061https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Suicide Risk3073Mental Health;Healthcare HarmToolkits & Guides;Reports & Publications4/21/2011 4:02:20 AMThe Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) has partnered with the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) to help healthcare workers and organizations select and compare available suicide risk assessment tools in Canada. For every death by suicide, 15-30 people are profoundly affected - this toolkit can help inform and strengthen the suicide risk assessment process. The Suicide Risk Assessment Toolkit seeks to provide a high-level overview of what to consider when using suicide risk assessment tools, along with a non-exhaustive list of available Canadian and international tools, and their characteristics. It is designed to be a quick, informative guide for healthcare workers and organizations interested in selecting and comparing such tools. The process of assessing suicide risk is complex. While assessment tools play an important role, they should be used to inform, not replace, clinical judgment. Use this toolkit, developed by CPSI and MHCC, to help you select/compare tools to complement the suicide risk assessment process. Download Toolkit (publication January 26, 2021) For a more comprehensive guide to suicide risk assessment, including the role of healthcare workers and organizations, see Suicide Risk Assessment Guide A Resource for Health Care Organizations. Download Guide (publication 2011) We acknowledge the need to have suicide risk assessment tools that are truly inclusive and are based on principles of equity and diversity. We encourage you to seek out opportunities to engage with diverse peoples, including First Nations, Inuit, Métis, people who identify as 2SLQBTQ+, and immigrant, refugee, ethnocultural and racialized groups in order to understand and respond to their specific needs. Sponsored by The Canadian Patient Safety Institute and the Mental Health Commission of Canada. Production of this toolkit has been made possible through a financial contribution from Health Canada. Suicide Risk Assessment - Toolkit and GuideThe Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) has partnered with the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) to help healthcare workers and2/4/2021 5:47:10 PM16850https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
The Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) Publications3074Infection Prevention & Control (IPAC)Reports & Publications12/3/2019 4:30:08 PM The Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) is a collaborative effort between the Public Health Agency of Canada's Centre for Communicable Diseases and Infection Control (CCDIC) and the National Microbiology Laboratory (NML), and sentinel hospitals across Canada who participate as members of the Canadian Hospital Epidemiology Committee (CHEC), a standing committee of the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease (AMMI) Canada. Established in 1994, the objectives of CNISP are to provide national and regional rates and trends on selected healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and antimicrobial resistant organisms (AROs), as well as provide key information that informs the development of federal, provincial and territorial infection prevention and control programs and policies. At present, 70 sentinel hospitals from 10 provinces and 1 territory participate in the CNISP network. Below are the definitions and protocols for the healthcare associated infections currently under surveillance by the CNISP. For protocols or documents not appearing below, contact CNISP cnisp-pcsin@phac-aspc.gc.ca Surveillance Definitions CNISP (Acute Care) HAI Surveillance Case definitions (2020) CNISP Surveillance Protocols COVID-19 and other viral respiratory infections (March 2021) Hospital Antibiogram Protocol (2020) Antimicrobial Utilization (AMU) Protocol (2020) Candida auris (C. auris) Protocol (2020) Carbapenemase-Producing Organisms (CPO) in CNISP Healthcare Facilities (2020) Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) Protocol (2020) Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infections (CLABSI) in Intensive Care Units (2020) Healthcare Acquired Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunt (CSF) Associated Infections (2021) Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA & MSSA) Bloodstream Infections in CNISP Hospitals (2021) Surgical Sites Infections Following Pediatric Cardiac Surgery (2020) Surgical Sites Infections Following Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty (2021) Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Bloodstream Infections in CNISP Hospitals (2020) Other Documents Canada Communicable Disease Report (Nosocomial Infection Surveillance, May 2020) CNISP Infographic Healthcare-associated infection rates in Canadian hospitals (2013-2017) CNISP Summary Report of Healthcare Associated Infection (HAI), Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) and Antimicrobial Use (AMU) Surveillance Data from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2017 Laboratory Surveillance 2019 Device-associated infections in Canadian acute-care hospitals from 2009 to 2018 The Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) PublicationsThe Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) is a collaborative effort between the Public Health Agency of Canada's Centre for12/1/2021 5:40:00 PM5219https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Report on the Integration of the Safety Competencies Framework3075General Patient Safety;Healthcare Harm;Improving CultureFrameworks;Reports & Publications9/12/2017 7:58:51 PM CPSI is pleased to present a comprehensive new report on the integration and impact of the Safety Competencies Framework (SCF) originally launched in 2008 in partnership with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. The framework has been one of the most downloaded documents on the CPSI website, consistently since its launch. Almost 10 years after the launch, this report examines the historical background of the SCF while providing a rationale for the development of the competencies, mapping of the competencies to integrate patient safety content in training programs. The report outlines the successes and challenges in the uptake of the competencies and includes a provocative call to action for educators. Several key findings were determined through interviews done with a select group of stakeholders familiar with the SCF and this feedback provided better understanding of the value of the competencies to organizations and professional bodies. As we look towards renewing the SCF to address feedback received, it is clear that despite the successes and challenges, we must shift our attention away from the "what" to focus on the "how" of integrating safety competencies in the curricula of health professionals on a more consistent basis. Download Report on the Integration of the Safety Competencies FrameworkCPSI is pleased to present a comprehensive new report on the integration and impact of the Safety Competencies Framework (SCF)9/24/2020 8:15:57 AM4586https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Results of 2018 Public Survey Related to the Labelling of Non-Prescription Health Products3076Improving Medication Safety;Government RelationsReports & Publications;Patient and Family Resource2/21/2019 3:31:22 PM As part of a Health Canada committee developing Plain Language Labelling regulations for non-prescription health products, Patients for Patient Safety Canada led a joint PFPSC and CPSI initiative to survey the public on the issue. Have people had problems with the labelling of non-prescription health products? The survey results indicate that consumers are often confused when purchasing self-care products. This raises concerns of harm are people choosing the wrong product because of this confusion? Our survey found that 29% of respondents said that they had wrongly purchased a natural health or homeopathic product, or over-the-counter drug; Another 29.5% said that they were not sure if they had wrongly purchased one of these products. The most cited reasons for the wrong purchase were Mixed it up with another product, Information about the product on the label was too small to read, or They were confused by, or did not understand, the information on the label. Some examples of comments on the survey include "I looked for Gravol on the drugstore shelf and all of the types of Gravol were together. When I saw Gravol ginger I thought it was Gravol with an added boost of ginger. When I got home and read the ingredients, I realized that there was not active ingredient in it. I feel I am a very health literate person, but I did not know the difference." "I did not realize the ingredients until I arrived home. Printing is so tiny on labels." "I bought a product for a yeast infection thinking it was for a Urinary Tract Infection" PFPSC represented members at the Health Canada table to ensure that "just like food products, all labels should be written in plain language, list all ingredients, and be printed in legible size." The results of this survey confirm that consumers want to know what's in the products they are taking. To protect Canadians from preventable harm, PFPSC and CPSI are calling for clear information and larger size lettering on the labels for non-prescription health products. Results of 2018 Public Survey Related to the Labelling of Non-Prescription Health Products  As part of a Health Canada committee developing Plain Language Labelling regulations for non-prescription health products, Patients for9/24/2020 8:16:23 AM2941https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Engaging Patients in Patient Safety – a Canadian Guide3078General Patient SafetyToolkits & Guides;Reports & Publications4/25/2017 3:01:50 PM In recent decades, evidence has emerged that demonstrates when healthcare providers work closely with patients and their families, the healthcare system is safer, and patients have better experiences and health outcomes. Engagement with patients and families includes program and service design and delivery as well as monitoring, evaluating, policy and priority setting, and governance. Engagement work is not easy and often may be uncomfortable at first. Providers may need to let go of control, change behaviours to actively listen to what patients are saying, and take additional time to understand the patient perspective. It may require more effective ways to brainstorm ideas together, build trust, and incorporate many different perspectives. Patients may need to participate more actively in decisions about their care. Leaders must support all this work by revising practices to embed patient engagement in their procedures, policies, and structures. Finding innovative ways to work together will benefit everyone. We invite you to join us in advancing engagement by making healthcare safer. Our deep belief in the power of partnership is inspired by the publication, Engaging Patients in Patient Safety – a Canadian Guide. It is written by patients, providers and leaders for patients, providers and leaders. We trust that you will find the information in this guide useful. It demonstrates our joint commitment to achieving safe and quality healthcare in Canada. Download Better yet, bookmark this page. This resource is updated regularly. To ensure you are accessing the most up-to-date version, we recommend that you bookmark this page for future reference. Who is this guide for? The guide is for anyone involved with patient safety and interested in engagement, including Patients and families interested in how to partner in their own care to ensure safety Patient partners interested in how to help improve patient safety Providers interested in creating collaborative care relationships with patients and families Managers and leaders responsible for patient engagement, patient safety, and/or quality improvement Anyone else interested in partnering with patients to develop care programs and systems While the guide focuses primarily on patient safety, many engagement practices apply to other areas, including quality, research, and education. The guide is designed to support patient engagement across the healthcare sector. What is the purpose of the guide? The purpose of the guide is to help patients and families, providers and leaders work more effectively together to improve patient safety. The guide is an extensive resource that is based on evidence and leading practices. What is included in the guide? Evidence-based guidance Practical patient engagement practices Consolidated information, resources, and tools Supporting evidence and examples from across Canada Experiences from patients and families, providers, and leaders Probing questions about how to strengthen current approaches Strategies and policies to meet standards and organizational practice requirements Click here to learn how and why was the guide developed. ​ ​ ​ CitationPatient Engagement Action Team. 2017. Engaging Patients in Patient Safety – a Canadian Guide. Canadian Patient Safety Institute. Last modified December 2019. Available at www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/engagingpatients Engaging Patients in Patient Safety – a Canadian GuideIn recent decades, evidence has emerged that demonstrates when healthcare providers work closely with patients and their families, the healthcare10/8/2020 8:27:08 PM30000https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Deteriorating Patient Condition3079General Patient Safety;Infection Prevention & Control (IPAC);Healthcare HarmToolkits & Guides3/30/2017 5:19:46 PM Early warning signs of deteriorating condition are often unrecognized, leading to devastating results. Research shows that virtually all critical inpatient events are preceded by warning signs that occur approximately six-and-a-half hours in advance. In this section, you'll find information, tools and resources to not only help you recognize deteriorating patient condition, but what you can do to act on it as a member of the public, a healthcare provider or leader. Click any of the icons below to get started! (updated in February 2020) Deteriorating Patient ConditionEarly warning signs of deteriorating condition are often unrecognized, leading to devastating results. Research shows that virtually all critical12/23/2020 8:11:28 PM4209https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Learn how to use and store methadone safely3081Improving Medication SafetyTip Sheets;Toolkits & Guides3/24/2021 8:07:00 PM Methadone is an opioid used to help people with opioid dependence. Unlike other opioids, it stays in the body a long time, preventing cravings and the discomfort of withdrawal. Like all other medications, methadone must be taken safely. Seeking help for your opioid dependence is a wise and important step in your road to recovery. Click here to learn how to use and store methadone safely. This information is brought to you in partnership between ISMP Canada and the Saskatchewan Ministry of Health, the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan's Opioid Agonist Therapy Program, Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH), the Saskatchewan Health Authority, Patients for Patient Safety Canada along with support from Canadian Patient Safety Institute. It has been reviewed by Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists (CSHP), the Nurse Practitioner Association of Canada (NPAC), The College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC), the Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA), and the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction (CCSA). Visit ISMP Canada for additional resources. Learn how to use and store methadone safelyMethadone is an opioid used to help people with opioid dependence. Unlike other opioids, it stays in the body a long time, preventing cravings and3/24/2021 8:10:17 PM313https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
MedError.ca3082Partnering with Patients;Patient & Family Resources;Improving Medication Safety;General Patient SafetyPatient and Family Resource10/26/2020 4:10:45 PM Medication errors cause harm to Canadians. Preventing such harm requires an understanding of where and why the medication safety system has failed, and the perspective of consumers is needed to advance this understanding. By sharing the learning from medication errors, consumers and providers can meaningfully work together to improve medication safety in Canada. Developed by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada (ISMP Canada) and CPSI, www.mederror.ca is a new website for the public to submit reports of medication errors for analysis, learning, and action. It builds on the work and success of SafeMedicationUse.ca, to create a more user-friendly portal to share their medication error experiences with the goal to improve the quality and quantity of incident reporting in Canada. Anyone can report and with the growing numbers of Canadians who take prescription and non-prescription medications in the community, it is important to understand and learn from the public. Whether it is a suspected medication error or medication reaction, the website provides a quick and easy way to provide valuable insight that contributes to patient safety improvement. Access Now Mederror.caMedication errors cause harm to Canadians. Preventing such harm requires an understanding of where and why the medication safety system has failed,11/3/2020 3:46:35 PM1982https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Medication Safety at Care Transitions Safety Improvement Project Learning Collaborative3083Improving Medication SafetyToolkits & Guides1/15/2019 9:35:30 PMWhat is Medication Safety? Medications are the most common treatment intervention used in healthcare around the world. When used safely and appropriately, they contribute to significant improvements in the health and well-being of patients. Medication safety is defined as freedom from preventable harm with medication use (ISMP Canada, 2007). Medication safety issues can impact health outcomes, length of stay in a healthcare facility, readmission rates, and overall costs to Canada's healthcare system. Medication Safety at Care Transitions Safety Improvement Project – An 18-month learning collaborative The Canadian Patient Safety Institute launched its Medication Safety- Safety Improvement Project in April 2019. This learning collaborative approach was delivered by expert faculty and coaches, with mentoring provided over 18 months. Participating teams learned and applied strategies to decrease readmissions related to medication safety issues at discharge among frail patients. Participant Learned To identify Frail clients who are at risk for medication safety issues, How to apply new processes for medication management at discharge, How to utilize Knowledge Translation and Implementation Science techniques to successfully implement and sustain new evidence-based practices for medication safety at transitions, To share key learnings and challenges, and networking with colleagues across Canada, Accessing, sharing and adopting advanced patient safety knowledge, tools, and resources within a learning network, Improving the team's approach to patient safety while taking action to deliver safer care. If you didn't have an opportunity to participate in the implementation collaborative, you can still access free resources below Get Started Kit 5 Questions to Ask About Your Medications Medication Reconciliation Measures Medication Reconciliation ResourcesMedication Safety at Care Transitions: Safety Improvement ProjectWhat is Medication Safety? Medications are the most common treatment intervention used in healthcare around the world. When used safely and2/10/2021 8:16:16 PM5973https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Safety Improvement Projects3084General Patient Safety;Improving Medication Safety;Community Based Care;Healthcare HarmFrameworks9/14/2018 2:50:29 PM The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) held 4 Safety Improvement Projects in 2018/2019. Thirty teams from across Canada participated in the Safety Improvement Project Learning Collaborative with a lifecycle of 18 months. A brief description of each project is provided below Teamwork and Communication focused on improving patient safety culture and positive patient outcomes. Medication Safety at Care Transitions focused on improving medication safety at discharge for frail, elderly patients with poly-morbidity. Enhanced Recovery Canada focused on improving outcomes and system efficiencies for colorectal surgery patients. Measurement and Monitoring of Safety focused on creating a culture of safety and reducing harm in organizations. The Safety Improvement Projects concluded with a virtual congress on October 28th and 29th 2020. Please see the short Highlights video (422). If you have any questions, please email SafetyImprovementProjects@cpsi-icsp.ca Safety Improvement Projects The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) held 4 Safety Improvement Projects in 2018/2019. Thirty teams from across Canada participated in the2/11/2021 5:55:44 PM7850https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Awareness of the Patient Safety Crisis in Canada3085General Patient Safety;Healthcare HarmPatient and Family Resource;Reports & Publications4/23/2019 2:52:28 PM4/23/2019 3:00:00 PMAwareness of the Patient Safety Crisis in Canada THE ISSUES We are facing a patient harm crisis of epidemic proportions. The Canadian public knows almost nothing about it. As soon as they learn, the public urgently prioritizes safer healthcare. Canadians should have an expectation that their healthcare is safe, and in most cases it is.However, every resident of Canada must learn that there are risks in our healthcare system, despite the efforts of thousands of dedicated healthcare providers across Canada. In our healthcare system, there is a death from patient harm every 13 minutes and 14 seconds. It is the third leading cause of death in Canada. One out of 18 hospital visits results in preventable harm. These incidents generate an additional $2.75 billion in healthcare treatment costs every year.This level of harm is simply unacceptable. Patient Safety Survey THE SURVEY In 2018, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) commissioned Ipsos Public Affairs to survey Canadians about their awareness of the rates of patient harm in our healthcare system. We sought a baseline read of Canadians' understanding of patient safety, with the main objectives of Assessing knowledge of patient safety and patient safety incidents in Canada; Understanding how Canadians prioritize patient safety; Determining how Canadians would like to receive information about patient safety, if at all; and, Assessing experience with patient safety incidents. Ipsos Public Affairs surveyed 1003 Canadian adults, weighted by gender, age, region and income. The credibility interval was +/- 3.5%. Ipsos found that while 44% of respondents identified as caregivers at some point in their lives, 30% stated they had a chronic disease or illness themselves. Out of the 199 respondents who identified as parents, 13% said that they have a child with a chronic illness. KEY FINDINGS Canadians show limited knowledge of patient harm. One third of Canadians rank patient safety in their top three healthcare priorities, with just under one in ten ranking it first. About one in ten correctly say that patient safety incidents are the third leading cause of death in Canada. Only one in ten Canadians believe that someone dies from a patient safety incident every 15 minutes in Canada. Six in ten say the $2.75 billion cost of patient safety incidents in Canada is higher than they expected. Despite the limited knowledge of the patient safety crisis in Canada, one in three Canadians has experienced a patient safety incident. One in three Canadians stated that they either personally experienced a patient safety incident (12%) or have a loved one who did (24%). Misdiagnosis, falls, infections and mistakes during treatment are the most common types of patient safety incidents. Those who have experienced a patient safety incident most commonly cite distracted or overworked health care providers as the largest contributing factors that led to the incident. Once informed about the scale of the problem, Canadians demonstrated far more concern about patient harm and wanted more information. Three‐quarters of Canadians are concerned about experiencing a patient safety incident, ranking it in their top three (compared to originally 1 in 3), including 1 in 4 ranking patient safety incidents as their top priority. Three in four Canadians are interested in learning how to keep safe in healthcare, Eighty per cent say they'd like to receive this information delivered via (in order of preference) healthcare provider; print, digital and in-person. This knowledge should be provided in real time (when patients go to the hospital for surgery and upon a new diagnosis of a serious health problem), but some also believe it should be general knowledge. CONCLUSIONS We are facing a patient harm crisis of epidemic proportions. The Canadian public knows almost nothing about it. As soon as they learn, the public urgently prioritizes safer healthcare. Canadians should have an expectation that their healthcare is safe, and in most cases it is. Every resident of Canada must learn that there are risks in our healthcare system, despite the efforts of thousands of dedicated healthcare providers across Canada.Healthcare providers, healthcare systems, and the Canadian Patient Safety Institute must empower residents of Canada with information and tools to ask good questions, connect with the right people, and learn as much as they can to keep them or a family member safe while receiving healthcare. Patient experience in the healthcare system should be characterized by clear, honest, two-way communication.WHAT CAN YOU DO?Ask us about patient experiences of harm in Canada's healthcare system. We invite you to read some of the stories shared by members of Patients for Patient Safety Canada, and the changes they have championed in our healthcare system to keep patients safer.Ask us what you can do to keep yourself and your loved ones safe in the healthcare system. The Canadian Patient Safety Institute designs and collects resources designed to help patients navigate the healthcare system by asking questions and being informed. Five Questions to Ask About Your Medications Tips and Tools for Talking to your Healthcare Team Tips to identify Deteriorating Patient Condition Shift to Safety tools and resource to keep you safe Share what you have learned. We have discovered that, as soon as we learn about the scale of the public healthcare crisis, we become far more concerned. Post your experiences on social media and use the hashtag #PatientSafetyRightNow – with your help, we will inform anyone who uses our healthcare system about the crisis and teach them how to keep themselves and their loved ones safe.ABOUT USThe Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) is the only national organization solely dedicated to reducing preventable harm, improving the safety of the healthcare system, and engaging patients and families as partners in safe care. Patients for Patient Safety Canada (PFPSC) is the patient-led program of CPSI and the Canadian arm of the World Health Organization's PFPS program. As patient partners, these volunteer members harmed by healthcare contribute to patient safety improvements at all system levels. CPSI and PFPSC are committed to working together with the public, patients, healthcare providers, and healthcare leaders to make Canadian healthcare safer. BACKGROUND INFORMATION 2018 Ipsos Patient Safety Survey Risk Analytica 2017 The Case for Investing in Patient Safety in Canada Ipsos 2016 National Health Leadership Conference Survey Canadian Patient Engagement Guide Awareness of the Patient Safety Crisis in CanadaAwareness of the Patient Safety Crisis in Canada THE ISSUES: We are facing a patient harm crisis of epidemic proportions. 9/24/2020 8:13:06 AM5520https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx