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Glossary of Terms97585/22/2018 7:52:41 PM This Glossary defines and describes the terms used in the Engaging Patients in Patient Safety – a Canadian Guide. When appropriate, use your organization's preferred or commonly used terms. Accreditation A self-assessment and external peer assessment process used by health and social service organizations to accurately assess performance levels against established standards, and to implement ways to continuously improve. Culture of safety Culture is "the way we do things around here." Culture refers to people's shared values (what is important) and beliefs (what is held to be true), which interact with an organization's structure or system to produce behavioural norms (what people do). Positive safety culture Communication is open and honest, there is mutual respect and trust among providers and patients, people are comfortable reporting safety concerns, and there are fair and just processes in place to examine, address, and learn from failures. Disclosure A formal process to openly discuss a patient safety incident with the patient, their family, and members of the healthcare organization. Engagement An approach to encourage the people most impacted to participate actively in defining their issues of concern, and help decide, plan, deliver, implement, evaluate, and improve initiatives, processes, and/or policies. Ongoing engagement involves developing and sustaining constructive relationships, building strong, active partnerships at various levels across the healthcare system, and holding a meaningful dialogue with partners. Types of engagement include surveys, consultations, and shared decision making, as described in the spectrum of engagement. Effective engagement is goal-focused, decision-oriented and values-based. Patient engagement An approach to involve patients, families, and/or patient partners in Their own healthcare The design, delivery, evaluation of health services A way that fits their circumstances Patients' experiential knowledge is recognized; and power is shared in ongoing, meaningful, constructive relationships at all system levels Direct care Healthcare organization (service design, governance) Health system (setting priorities and policies) Public engagement involving the public/ citizens before or after they access the healthcare system (e.g. make healthy and informed decisions regarding care) Spectrum (continuum, levels) of engagement The range of ways patient engagement takes place. It can span from input and consultation to shared leadership, accountability, and decision making. Evaluation Collecting, analyzing, and using data and information to understand how a project, program, or policy is progressing and/or what is its impact on individuals, organizations, and/or society. Evaluation often measures success or importance in relation to goals, objectives, and needs. Incident analysis (or root cause analysis) Structured, rigorous, often legally-protected and confidential process to review a patient safety incident. It identifies what happened, how, why it happened, what can be done to reduce the risk of recurrence and make care safer, and what was learned. It examines the whole system of care to identify the factors that contributed to the patient safety incident. Incident management Various actions and processes required immediately and on an ongoing basis following a patient safety incident. It includes immediate response, disclosure, incident analysis, sharing and learning. Patient and family Patient Person who is receiving, has received, or has requested health services. It refers to all other terms for patient, including client, resident, person, and individual. Family Person(s) whom the patient wishes to be involved in their care, and act on their behalf or interests. Family is defined by the patient. This person speaks up on behalf of the patient with the patient's input. Note because of the inconsistent terminology some use the term "those most impacted" instead of patient. Patient partner (or advisor) An individual who experienced care in the healthcare system (as a patient, family member or caregiver) and who, as part of a patient group (e.g., patient/family council), engages in shaping decisions, policies, and/or practices at all system levels. Patient representative An employee working in a healthcare setting who helps patients and families with their specific concerns, and answers their questions while in a healthcare facility. This person is the link between patients/ families, and providers/ organization. Person (Patient, family) Centred Care An approach to care where patients and healthcare professionals partner to Give patients a voice in the design and delivery of the care and services they receive Allow patients to be proactive in their healthcare journey for better health outcome; and Improve the experience of patients People-centred care An approach to care that consciously adopts individuals', carers', families' and communities' perspectives as participants in, and beneficiaries of, trusted health systems that are organized around the comprehensive needs of people rather than individual diseases, and respects their preferences. People-centred care is broader than patient and person-centred care, encompassing not only clinical encounters, but also including attention to the health of people in their communities and their crucial role in shaping health policy and health services. Patient empowerment (or activation) Helping patients gain control over their own lives and increase their capacity to act on issues that they themselves define as important. Aspects of empowerment include self-efficacy, self-awareness, confidence, coping skills, and health literacy. Patient experience The sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization's culture, that influence patient perceptions, across the continuum of care. Patient safety The pursuit of the reduction and mitigation of unsafe acts within the health care system, as well as the use of best practices shown to lead to optimal patient outcomes. Patient safety is one of the dimensions of quality. Patient safety incident An event or circumstance which could have resulted, or did result, in unnecessary harm to a patient. It includes Near miss A patient safety incident that did not reach the patient. Replaces "close call." No harm incident A patient safety incident that reached a patient, but no discernible harm resulted. Harmful incident A patient safety incident that resulted in harm to the patient. Other terms sometimes still used to describe a harmful incident are adverse event or critical incident. Patient safety science Methods to acquire and apply safety knowledge to create highly reliable systems that approach "fail-safe" conditions (i.e., those in which the operator cannot perform the function improperly). Past effort has been directed toward developing defences, which are barriers that prevent an unsafe act from resulting in harm. Over the years, healthcare has developed many of these barriers, and usually several must be breached for patient harm to occur Measurement A process essential to monitoring success. It indicates what's working and what's not, and can provide evidence for others to improve the quality of patient safety. Measures (metrics) Standard for determining an organization or initiative's activities and performance. Performance measures Monitors, evaluates, and communicates the extent to which various activities of the organization or the healthcare system meet their key objectives. Process measures Assesses what is being done and how (e.g., engagement activities, strategies or methods which directly affect the outcome), what is working well, and what needs to be changed or improved (e.g., the delivery of timely prophylactic antibiotics to reduce surgical site infection). Outcome measures Determines what effects the engagement had, what it did or did not accomplish, and what success looks like (e.g., to reduce falls, teams should measure the number of falls). Balancing measures Determines if improvements in one part of the system were made at the expense of other processes in other parts of the system (e.g., in a project to reduce the average length of stay for a group of patients, the team should also monitor the percent of readmissions within 30 days for the same group). Providers (or clinicians) Includes physicians, nurses, and allied health care professionals who directly provide healthcare services to patients. The term does not include the family members providing care (family caregivers or care partners). Quality of care The degree to which healthcare services produce the desired health outcomes and measure up to current evidence and knowledge. The attributes most often used to describe quality care are safe, patient-centred, accessible, appropriate, effective, efficient, and equitable. Each province or organization may have their own quality frameworks. Quality Improvement A systematic approach to making changes that lead to better patient outcomes and stronger health system performance. It involves applying quality improvement science, which provides a robust structure, tools, and processes to assess and accelerate efforts for testing, implementing, and spreading good practices. Information Qualitative information Descriptive information, such as patient stories, notes from interviews or focus group discussions, and observation notes. Qualitative information can be systematically analyzed to identify issues of interest. Quantitative information Information that measures characteristics using a numeric value (e.g., gender, income, marital status, etc.). The numeric values can be statistically analyzed to identify issues of interest. Stakeholder A person who has a vested interest in engagement outcomes and who could be affected by any decisions taken or changes made. Stakeholders could include patients, families, caregivers, providers, administrative staff, suppliers, organizational partners, the community, the public and others. System levels The healthcare system is comprised of many sub-systems operating at different levels (e.g., outside of the organization, within the organization and/or program level, at point of care) each with specific goals, resources (e.g., human, financial, equipment), and formal or informal processes. Point of care direct care (patient and family receiving care and providers and others who deliver care and services) Organization program/ unit/service and facility/organization/ health region (service design and delivery, strategy, system planning, organizational design, governance) System the sum of all the organizations, institutions, and resources that deliver health care services to meet the health needs of a target population (policy, planning, resourcing, research, education, accreditation) Validated tool/survey/questionnaire A measurement tool that has been tested for reliability (produces consistent results) and validity (produces true results).References Canadian Patient Safety Institute. Patient Safety and Incident Management Toolkit. Glossary. 2015. Carman KL, Dardess P, Maurer M, Sofaer S, Adams K, Bechtel C, Sweeney J. Patient and family engagement a framework for understanding the elements and developing interventions and policies. Health Aff (Millwood). 2013 Feb;32(2)223-31 Charles Vincent, René Amalberti. Safer Healthcare. Strategies for the Real World. Springer, Cham. 2016. Emanuel LL, Taylor L, Hain A, Combes JR, Hatlie MJ, Karsh B, Lau DT, Shalowitz J, Shaw T, Walton M, eds. The Patient Safety Education Program – Canada (PSEP – Canada) Curriculum. © PSEP – Canada, 2016. European Patients Forum. Patient Empowerment http//www.eu-patient.eu/campaign/PatientsprescribE/ Health Quality Council of Alberta. The Alberta Quality Matrix for Health. Health Quality Ontario. Quality Matters Realizing Excellent Care for All. 2015. Institute for Patient- and Family-Centered Care. What is patient and family centred care. Safer Healthcare Now! Improvement Frameworks Getting Started Kit. 2015 The Beryl Institute. Defining Patient Experience. World Health Organization Secretariat. Framework on Integrated, People-Centred Health Services. World Health Organization; 2016. https//www.who.int/servicedeliverysafety/areas/people-centred-care/framework/en/. This Glossary defines and describes the terms used in the Engaging Patients in Patient Safety – a Canadian Guide . When appropriate, use your6/19/2020 9:15:50 PM2045https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Patient-Engagement-in-Patient-Safety-Guide/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Measures: Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP)10529Infection Prevention & Control (IPAC)Toolkits & Guides7/1/2015 8:57:33 AM Measurement is essential to monitoring success and helps guide your team towards your specific intervention goal. Measurement also tells us what's working and what's not, and provides evidence to inspire other healthcare providers to improve the quality of patient safety. The measurement methodology and recommendations regarding sampling size referenced in this GSK, is based on The Model for Improvement and is designed to accelerate the pace of improvement using the PDSA cycle; a "trial and learn" approach to improvement based on the scientific method. Langley, G., Nolan, K., Nolan, T., Norman, C., Provost, L. The Improvement Guide A Practical Approach to Enhancing Organizational Performance. San Francisco, Second Edition, CA. Jossey-Bass Publishers. 2009. It is not intended to provide the same rigor that might be applied in a research study, but rather offers an efficient way to help a team understand how a system is performing. When choosing a sample size for your intervention, it is important to consider the purposes and uses of the data and to acknowledge when reporting that the findings are based on an "x" sample as determined by the team. The scope or scale (amount of sampling, testing, or time required) of a test should be decided according to The team's degree of belief that the change will result in improvement The risks from a failed test Readiness of those who will have to make the change Provost, Lloyd P; Murray, Sandra (2011-08-26). The Health Care Data Guide Learning from Data for Improvement (Kindle Locations 1906-1909). Wiley. Kindle Edition. Please refer to the Improvement Frameworks GSK (2015) for additional information.VAP Measures Measure Goal Type VAP 1 - VAP Rate in ICU per 1000 Ventilator Days Decrease 50% Outcome VAP 2 - VAP Bundle Compliance 95% Process VAP 3 - Paediatric VAP Bundle Compliance 95% Process Measures and definitions Types of Measures Safer Healthcare Now! (SHN) has two types of measures for each of the interventions process measures and outcome measures. Some interventions also have balancing measures and information measures. Below are examples of each. Outcome measures - answers whether the team is achieving what it is trying to accomplish and articulates the picture of success. For example, if the team wants to reduce falls it should measure the number of falls. Process measures - Processes which directly affect the outcome are measured to ensure that all key changes are being implemented to impact the outcome measure. For example, the delivery of timely prophylactic antibiotics to reduce surgical site infection. Balancing measures - answer the question whether improvements in one part of the system were made at the expense of other processes in other parts of the system. For example, in a project to reduce the average length of stay for a group of patients, the team should also monitor the percent of readmissions within 30 days for the same group. Information measures - collect general details relative to the intervention.VAP: Measurement Worksheets9/24/2020 8:15:22 AM14152https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/psm/Pages/Forms/UpdateData.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Glossary of Terms99062/24/2010 6:21:45 PM Adverse event An event that results in unintended harm to the patient, and is related to the care and/or services provided to the patient rather than to the patient’s underlying medical condition. Close call An event that did not reach the patient because of timely intervention or good fortune. (The term is often equated to a near miss or near hit.) Disclosure The process by which an adverse event is communicated to the patient by healthcare providers. Initial disclosure The first communication made with the patient as soon as reasonably possible after an adverse event, focusing on the known facts and the provision of further clinical care. Post-analysis disclosure Subsequent communications with the patient about known facts related to the reasons for the harm after an appropriate analysis of the adverse event. Harm An outcome that negatively affects the patient’s health and/or quality of life. Just culture of safety A healthcare approach in which the provision of safe care is a core value of the organization. The culture encourages and develops the knowledge, skills, and commitment of all leaders, management, healthcare providers, staff, and patients for the provision of safe patient care. Opportunities to proactively improve the safety of care are constantly identified and acted on. Providers and patients are appropriately and adequately supported in the pursuit of safe care. The culture encourages learning from adverse events and close calls to strengthen the system, and where appropriate, supports and educates healthcare providers and patients to help prevent similar events in the future. There is a shared commitment across the organization to implement improvements and to share the lessons learned. Justice is an important element. All are aware of what is expected, and when analyzing adverse events, any professional accountability of health care providers is determined fairly. The interests of both patients and providers are protected. Patient safety The pursuit of the reduction and mitigation of unsafe acts within the healthcare system, as well as the use of best practices shown to lead to optimal patient outcomes. Patient safety is the reduction of risk of unnecessary harm associated with healthcare to an acceptable minimum. An acceptable minimum refers to the collective notions of given current knowledge, resources available, and the context in which care was delivered weighed against the risk of non-treatment or other treatment. Quality The degree to which health services for individuals and populations increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge. Quality Improvement Review The analysis by healthcare organizations (usually by a quality improvement committee) of patient outcomes, clinical practices, and systems of care in order to recommend improvements. Quality improvement committees, as part of an ongoing program to improve patient care, should be structured under the relevant provincial/territorial legislation and include formal terms of reference. Quality improvement committees, depending on the province or territory, may have different titles, for example, Quality of Care, Critical Incident Review, or Risk Management. Reporting The communication of information about an adverse event or close call by healthcare providers through appropriate channels inside or outside of healthcare organizations for the purpose of reducing the risk of adverse events in the future. Root cause analysis An analytic tool that can be used to perform a comprehensive, system-based review of critical incidents. It includes the identification of the root and contributory factors, identification of risk reduction strategies, and development of action plans along with measurement strategies, to evaluate the effectiveness of the plans. This glossary is not intended to be an exhaustive list of terms, but rather a concise list of key terms used throughout the tool kit. For more information, use these references World Health Organization’s (WHO) International Classification for Patient Safety Key Concepts and Preferred Terms Canadian Disclosure Guidelines The Safety Competencies Learning from adverse events Fostering a just culture of safety in Canadian hospitals and health care institutionsGlossary of Terms7/7/2015 4:01:16 PM6836https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/GovernancePatientSafety/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Tools & Resources25029/18/2020 4:40:20 AMTools & ResourcesTools & Resources9/21/2020 9:19:04 AM82793https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/enhtmlTrueaspx
Creating a Safe Space: Addressing the Psychological Safety of Healthcare Workers2623General Patient Safety;Psychological Safety for Healthcare WorkersToolkits & Guides;Healthcare provider stories;Reports & Publications1/6/2020 4:59:11 PM Cumulative stress, compassion fatigue and trauma due to experiences with patient safety incidents impact the mental wellness of our healthcare providers. These factors contribute to inadvertent patient care errors, mental health issues and attrition which compromise patient safety. A peer support program and other support models not only simply helps healthcare workers with their experiences with patient safety incidents but also improves the system and help make patient care safe. The Creating a Safe Space Addressing the Psychological Safety of Healthcare Workers manuscript and the Canadian Peer Support Network are intended to assist healthcare organizations support healthcare workers by creating peer-to-peer support programs (PSPs) or other models of supports to improve the emotional well-being of healthcare workers and allow them to provide the best and safest care to their patients. The Creating a Safe Space Addressing the Psychological Safety of Healthcare Workers manuscript provides a comprehensive overview of what healthcare worker support models are available in Canada and internationally. The Manuscript outlines best practice guidelines, tools, and resources that policy makers, accreditation bodies, regulators and healthcare leaders can use to assess the support needs of healthcare workers. The Canadian Peer Support Network is intended as a forum for healthcare organizations seeking guidance in the development of their Peer Support Programs to assist providers who have experienced a patient safety incident. Download Disclaimer The Canadian Peer Support Network is not intended as therapeutic support between, or amongst, members It is for informational purposes only. Creating a Safe Space: Psychological Safety of Healthcare Workers (Peer to Peer Support and Other Support Models)Cumulative stress, compassion fatigue and trauma due to experiences with patient safety incidents impact the mental wellness of our healthcare12/1/2020 4:47:37 PM13178https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Canadian Quality and Patient Safety Framework for Health Services2639General Patient Safety;Policy;Government Relations;Improving Culture;Partnering with Patients;Patient & Family ResourcesFrameworks;Patient and Family Resource;Position Statements;Reports & Publications3/27/2019 7:47:40 PM The need for a national patient safety and quality framework Health services across Canada are comprehensive, complex, and at times complicated. Every person in Canada deserves safe, high-quality healthcare when and where they need it. For the most part, this is our experience. But we don't always get it right. People may be inadvertently harmed by the services intended to help them. The reality is that unintended harm occurs in a Canadian hospital or home care setting every 1 minute and 18 seconds Every 13 minutes and 14 seconds, someone dies Patient safety incidents are the third leading cause of death in Canada Even more, there are significant variations in care by age, gender, race/ethnicity, geography and socio-economic status. Access to quality health services is more challenging for Indigenous peoples, (including First Nations, Inuit and Métis), Black people, LQBTQ2S+ identities (including Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer or Questioning and Two-Spirit), immigrants, visible minorities, and many more diverse peoples that comprise our country. While some jurisdictions have quality and safety plans or frameworks in place, people continue to experience healthcare differently across the country. These considerations, when added to the heightened need for consistency and coordination in healthcare due to the COVID-19 pandemic, prompt us to ask How can we focus and align quality and safety improvement throughout the country, regardless of jurisdiction? The Canadian Quality and Patient Safety Framework for Health Services is the first of its kind in Canada. We can all work together to accelerate quality and patient safety across Canadian health systems by focusing all stakeholders across Canada on five goals for safe, quality care. This people-centred framework defines five goal areas designed to drive improvement and to align Canadian legislation, regulations, standards, organizational policies, and public engagement on patient safety and quality improvement. It includes action guides and resources customized for each stakeholder group to support you in putting the goals into practice. Download the Framework How to use the Framework Be sure to take full advantage of all the communications tools and resources in this package Download the Communication Toolkit Leading Practice How have you used the Canadian Quality and Patient Safety Framework to drive quality and safety improvements? Please email leadingpractices@healthstandards.org and share your experience with us for an opportunity to be profiled as a Leading Practice or a case study.Evaluation Survey How is the Canadian Quality and Patient Safety Framework helping you align with Canada on five goals for quality, safe care? Heathcare Excellence Canada and Health Standards Organization welcome your feedback (10 min survey) Take survey Mapping Tool A mapping tool was developed to help you map your organization's current quality and patient safety improvement initiatives to the goals, objectives, and outcomes of the Framework. This exercise will help demonstrate your organization's strengths in aligning with the Framework and uncover opportunities to work toward these key goals for safe, high-quality care. Framework Mapping Tool For any questions, comments or to share your experience using the Framework, please contact qualityservicesforall@healthstandards.org. Contact us Why does Canada need a National Quality and Patient Safety Framework for Health Services?The need for a national patient safety and quality framework Health services across Canada are comprehensive, complex, and at times complicated.6/21/2021 7:31:24 PM32673https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Infection Prevention and Control (IPAC): Getting Started Kit6188Infection Prevention & Control (IPAC);Surgical Care SafetyToolkits & Guides7/1/2015 8:55:35 AMEffective March 14 2019, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute has archived the Infection Prevention and Control (IPAC) intervention. Though you may continue to access the Getting Started Kit online, it will no longer be updated. ​​​ Getting Started Kit This free resource is designed to help you successfully implement interventions in your organization. The Getting Started Kit contains clinical information, information on the science of improvement, and everything you need to know to start using the intervention. Click here to download the NACS Getting Started Kit. ​ One-Pager The One-Pager is a summary of the Getting Started Kit that you can use to promote the intervention to your organization. Click here to download the One-Pager.​​ Icons​​ Intervention IconsUse these intervention icons on presentations, reports, flyers, and other material to promote the intervention throughout your organization. Click here to download the full-colour intervention icon. Click here to download the black and white intervention icon. NACS: Getting Started Kit9/24/2020 8:10:44 AM9713https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Pages/Forms/NewDefaultView.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Indigenous Perspectives on Patient Safety6172General Patient SafetyPatient and Family Resource;Webinars10/3/2019 7:42:46 PM Archive A webinar designed with Indigenous leaders and patient partners The goal of this virtual discussion is to expand our understanding how people from Indigenous communities experience patient safety. After hearing the perspectives of patients, providers and leaders from Indigenous communities on how they perceive safety and what solutions are/ can be implemented, we will leave the session with at least one practical idea for engaging all patients, families and/or the public in improving patient safety. Download Speakers Marilyn Shingoose – Elder Samaria Nancy Cardinal - Patients for Patient Safety Canada Dr. Alika Lafontaine – Anesthesiologist, Grande Prairie, Alberta Gina Gaspard – British Columbia First Nations Health Authority Resources Coyote's Food Medicines (FNHA, Doctors of BC, with guidance from Secwepemc Elders, 2019) How much is too much when it comes to medication? (FNHA, 2016) Engaging Patients in Patient Safety – a Canadian Guide (Patient Engagement Action Team, Guide, 2018) Diversity Learning Exchange (Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement, Event Proceedings, 2019) Recruiting for Diversity (Health Quality Ontario, Guide, 2017) EVERY Patient Should Experience Safe Care (Patients for Patient Safety Canada, Webinar Proceedings, 2018) How Safe is the Care We Receive? (Patients for Patient Safety Canada, Webinar Proceedings, 2019) Designed with Indigenous leaders and patient partners, this interactive webinar is offered by Patients for Patient Safety Canada. The session is designed to allow for conversation among participants, so be prepared to contribute to the dialogue. The webinar recording and slides (in English) will be publicly available after the session here. For more information or to share your experience, a resource, or feedback, please contact us at patients@cpsi-icsp.ca. Archive A webinar designed with Indigenous leaders and patient partners The goal of this virtual discussion is to expand our9/24/2020 8:12:31 AM4214https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Pages/Forms/NewDefaultView.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
TeamSTEPPS Canada(TM) Essentials microlearning course launched through Canada’s Patient Safety Online Learning Centre14177Education;General Patient SafetyNews9/14/2020 3:34:10 PM9/14/2020 6:00:00 AM Are you looking for tools to instil a culture of safety among your teams? A free micro-learning course, TeamSTEPPS Canada™ Essentials, is now available to optimize team performance across the healthcare system. The course consists of six interactive microlearning sessions that demonstrate teamwork and communication tools that can be used to equip your team for improved team functioning. "Initially, the material was designed to support the Safety Improvement Project Collaborative participants," says Maureen Sullivan-Bentz, Senior Program Manager at the Canadian Patient Safety Institute. "TeamSTEPPS Essentials has since been adapted and designed to accommodate the changing needs of today's learners in an interactive and engaging format. Teams can now easily access the course online and learn at their own pace." The Essentials course is based on the five key principles encompassed in the evidence-based TeamSTEPPS CanadaTM framework. These principles are designed to optimize team performance Team Structure, Communication, Leading Teams, Situation Monitoring, and Mutual Support. Each session is five minutes long; at the end of the program teams are familiarized with the tools to use in different situations. Each of the sessions has been enhanced with simulation videos and has been contextualized for Canadian audiences. The Centre for Innovative Education and Simulation in Nursing at the University of Ottawa generously provided their simulation lab as the backdrop for filming; props were provided by the University of Ottawa; and the contributions of Ben Hrkach, both as Director and one of the actors, were invaluable in creating a fun and creative portrayal of the teamwork and communication tools. Canada's Patient Safety Online Learning Centre Canada's Patient Safety Online Learning Centre takes learning anywhere, anytime, at your own pace, on any electronic device. This free, open source learning centre will house a repository of e-courses from the Canadian Patient Safety Institute. It was designed to provide open access to healthcare leaders, managers, educators, and point-of-care providers to learn as efficiently as possible in a self-paced environment. "The world of technology has advanced, and learning needs have evolved," says Gina de Souza, Senior Program Manager at the Canadian Patient Safety Institute. "People want on-demand learning in short snippets. Canada's Patient Safety Online Learning Centre is learner-centric and accommodates the increasing demands and diversity of learners using new tools, technologies, and design strategies." Learners must register to gain access, and once registered, they can explore all of the available e-courses for free. There are no learning pre-requisites required. A certificate of completion is available to print after each course is completed. Click here to learn more about Canada's Patient Safety Online Learning Centre and register for the TeamSTEPPS Essentials course. Watch for the quick-start microlearning version of the Guide to Patient Safety Improvement publication, to be added this fall. Are you looking for tools to instil a culture of safety among your teams? A free micro-learning course, TeamSTEPPS Canada™ Essentials , is now9/24/2020 8:10:14 AM1879https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/NewsAlerts/News/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection (CLABSI): Getting Started Kit6149Infection Prevention & Control (IPAC);Surgical Care SafetyToolkits & Guides7/1/2015 8:51:29 AM ​​​Effective March 14 2019, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute has archived the Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection (CLABSI) intervention. Though you may continue to access the Getting Started Kit online, it will no longer be updated. These free resources are designed to help you successfully implement interventions in your organization. Getting Started ​Getting Started Kit The Getting Started Kit contains clinical information, information on the science of improvement, and everything you need to know to start using the intervention. Click here to download the Getting Started Kit. ​One-Pager The One-Pager is a summary of the Getting Started Kit that you can use to promote the intervention to your organization. Click here to download the One-Pager. ​​Icons ​Intervention Icons Use these intervention icons on presentations, reports, flyers, and other material to promote the intervention throughout your organization. Click here to download the full-colour intervention icon. Click here to download the black and white intervention icon. Intervention Icons With Text Click here to download the full-colour intervention icon with text. Click here to download the black and white intervention icon with text. CLI: Getting Started Kit9/24/2020 8:10:31 AM12827https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Pages/Forms/NewDefaultView.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Reducing Falls and Injury from Falls (Falls): Getting Started Kit6155Community Based CareToolkits & Guides7/1/2015 8:52:44 AM​Effective March 14 2019, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute has archived the Reducing Falls and Injury from Falls intervention. Though you may continue to access the Getting Started Kit online, it will no longer be updated. ​ Getting Started Kit This free resource is designed to help you successfully implement interventions in your organization. The Getting Started Kit contains clinical information, information on the science of improvement, and everything you need to know to start using the intervention. Click h​ere to download the Getting Started Kit. ​ ​ ​Falls Prevention GSK Evidence Update! New for 2018 Click here to download. ​ One-Pager ​The One-Pager is a summary of the Getting Started Kit that you can use to promote the intervention to your organization. Click here to download the One-Pager for reducing falls and Injury from falls.​ ​ Framework for Spread (Appendix N from Falls Getting Started Kit) This appendix contains a description of the seven components of a spread framework along with elements of spread readiness. Click here to download the Spread Framework​​ Icons​​ ​ Intervention IconsUse these intervention icons on presentations, reports, flyers, and other material to promote the intervention throughout your organization. Click here to download the full-colour intervention icon. Click here to download the black and white intervention icon.​ ​ Intervention Icons With Text Click here to download the full-colour intervention icon with text. Click here to download the black and white intervention icon with text. Effective March 14 2019, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute has archived the Reducing Falls and Injury from Falls intervention. Though you may9/24/2020 8:10:41 AM14378https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Pages/Forms/NewDefaultView.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Advocacy and support for use of a Surgical Safety Checklist2607Surgical Care SafetyPosition Statements2/5/2019 7:55:32 PMPosition StatementA Surgical Safety Checklist is smart for patients and smart for providers. It's use in Canadian healthcare facilities is endorsed by a Position Statement supported by many surgical interest groups. ​Healthcare professionals must make every reasonable effort to provide safe care to their patients. The purpose of this statement is to express the commitment of the undersigned organizations to prioritize perioperative patient safety by creating an environment conducive to the effective adoption and use of a Surgical Safety Checklist. Download Advocacy and support for use of a Surgical Safety ChecklistPosition Statement A Surgical Safety Checklist is smart for patients and smart for providers. It's use in Canadian healthcare facilities9/24/2020 8:13:01 AM3060https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Hand Hygiene Human Factors Toolkit6170Infection Prevention & Control (IPAC);Surgical Care SafetyToolkits & Guides6/3/2015 4:47:25 PM​​​​​Human Factors is the study of how humans interact with the world around them. Studying how people interact with equipment and materials allows us to change the environment in which we work to make the interaction more useful or helpful. A user-friendly hand hygiene environment is one where staff, patients, and visitors are supported in such a way that participating in optimal hand hygiene activities can take place in the right place and at the right time. Developed by the Canadian Patient Safety Institute in conjunction with 3M and the University Health Network, the Hand Hygiene Human Factors Toolkit is designed to help you conduct the assessments necessary to assure that hand hygiene products are located where they are needed, available in the right quantity, visible, within reach, fully stocked and functional, and in the best form. Click here to order the full-colour, spiral-bound toolkit. Extra copies of the assessment forms can be downloaded in PDF format Environment tool Product tool Process tool Ongoing assessment toolsHuman Factors is the study of how humans interact with the world around them. Studying how people interact with equipment and materials allows us to9/24/2020 8:12:26 AM9039https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Pages/Forms/NewDefaultView.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Canada's Virtual Forum2587General Patient SafetyEvents7/12/2011 8:55:44 PM​​​​​​​​ Thank you to the more than 1,100 viewers from the nearly 600 sites in Canada and 6 countries around the world that made Canada's Virtual Forum on Patient Safety & Quality Improvement a huge success! If you weren't able to watch live, or if you want to watch anything again, click here to access the archives and watch recordings of each of our sessions. Make use of these recordings during your in-services and as part of your local education sessions. 2015 Archive​s We would like to hear from you To help us plan for future events, we'd like to have your feedback. Please tell us what went well or what we could do better by completing our survey. Questions or comments? Contact CPSI Communications at info@cpsi-icsp.ca.Canada’s Virtual Forum on Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Thank you to the more than 1,100 viewers from the nearly 600 sites in Canada and 6 countries around the world that made Canada's Virtual9/24/2020 8:05:32 AM13956https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/EventshtmlTrueaspx
World Patient Safety Day2588General Patient SafetyEvents8/31/2020 8:43:30 PM Visit the World Patient Safety Day new home page on the Healthcare Excellence Canada website for the 2021 campaign. Check it out Below are details from the 2020 World Patient Safety Day campaign. Premiere of Building a Safer System Thank you for joining us for World Patient Safety Day! Thank you for joining us for the live streaming of Building a Safer System, the documentary celebrating Canadian Patient Safety Institute's 17-year impact on Canada's healthcare system. #BuildingaSaferSystem In case you missed it, the documentary is available on our Youtube channel. The CPSI Legacy Celebration On September 17th, former staff members, colleagues, and supporters of CPSI gathered to re-connect and celebrate the organization on the Remo conferences platform. A panel of CEOs discussed the future of patient safety, and Donna Davis of Patients for Patient Safety Canada powerfully represented the patient voice. Click below to view the recording of the panel discussion and the closing keynote remarks World Health Organization The COVID-19 pandemic has unveiled the huge challenges and risks health workers are facing globally including health care associated infections, violence, stigma, psychological and emotional disturbances, illness and even death. Furthermore, working in stressful environments makes health workers more prone to errors which can lead to patient harm. Therefore, on World Patient Safety Day 2020 Theme Health Worker Safety A Priority for Patient Safety Slogan Safe health workers, Safe patients Call for action Speak up for health worker safety! World Patient Safety Day information Sponsored by With special thanks to our generous sponsors – together we are making positive and lasting change. Platinum Gold (in alphabetical order) World Patient Safety Day: September 17, 2021Visit the World Patient Safety Day new home page on the Healthcare Excellence Canada website for the 2021 campaign.  Check it9/15/2021 1:34:34 PM19476https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/EventshtmlTrueaspx
Canadian Patient Safety Week (CPSW)2590General Patient SafetyEvents12/8/2009 9:50:43 PM The theme for this year’s Canadian Patient Safety Week will be announced soon. The campaign will be hosted on the new Healthcare Excellence Canada website. Check it out Below are details from the 2020 Canadian Patient Safety Week campaign. Virtual Care is New to Us #ConquerSilence Thank you to everyone who participated in Canadian Patient Safety Week from October 26 to 30, 2020. Let’s Keep the Momentum Going The theme of Canadian Patient Safety Week 2020 was Virtual Care is New to Us. Only 10% of Canadians have experience with virtual care1, but 41% would like to have virtual visits with their healthcare providers2. The way to ensure that healthcare providers and patients make the most of virtual appointments is to use tried and true basics – encourage patients to ask questions and to bring an advocate with them to appointments. Although Canadian Patient Safety Week 2020 has passed, virtual care is here to stay! Please continue to access and share the virtual care resources below.Virtual Care Resources – ConquerSilence.ca Access valuable resources for you, your colleagues, and your patients to improve virtual care appointments. We worked with the Canadian Medical Association to develop a WEBside manner infographic for healthcare providers, plus two virtual care checklists and a how to make the most of your virtual visit infographic for patients. Access Now PATIENT Podcast Series Listen to season 4 of our award-winning PATIENT podcast! Listen Here Are your patients ready for Virtual care? Share our free online quiz with your patients Virtual care Quiz About Canadian Patient Safety Week is a national, annual campaign that started in 2005 to inspire extraordinary improvement in patient safety and quality. As the momentum for promoting best practices in patient safety has grown, so has the participation in Canadian Patient Safety Week. Canadian Patient Safety week is relevant to anyone who engages with our healthcare system providers, patients, and citizens. Working together, thousands help spread the message to Conquer Silence. Partners Sponsorship If your organization is interested in sponsoring a portion of CPSW 2020, please contact sponsorshipsmail@cpsi-icsp.ca. We have many opportunities available. Virtual Care Definition Virtual care has been defined as any interaction between patients and/or members of their circle of care, occurring remotely, using any forms of communication or information technologies with the aim of facilitating or maximizing the quality and effectiveness of patient care. (CMA definition) Do you have any questions or suggestions? Contact CPSI Communications Email CPSW@cpsi-icsp.ca Join the conversation at #ConquerSilence 1https//www.cma.ca/sites/default/files/pdf/virtual-care/ReportoftheVirtualCareTaskForce.pdf 2https//www.cma.ca/sites/default/files/pdf/virtual-care/ReportoftheVirtualCareTaskForce.pdf; https//actt.albertadoctors.org/file/VirtualVisitsLitSummary2020.pdf Canadian Patient Safety WeekCanadian Patient Safety Week (CPSW)9/10/2021 8:53:37 PM129660https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/EventshtmlTrueaspx
Clean Your Hands Day2592Infection Prevention & Control (IPAC)Events6/3/2015 4:46:05 PM Visit Clean Your Hands Day new home page on the Healthcare Excellence Canada website. Check it out Clean Your Hands DayVisit Clean Your Hands Day new home page on the Healthcare Excellence Canada website. Check it out5/14/2021 3:20:35 PM97408https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/EventshtmlTrueaspx
Excellence in Patient Engagement for Patient Safety2594General Patient Safety;Improving Culture;Partnering with PatientsEvents7/24/2015 10:09:51 AM A Program Recognizing Patient Engagement Leaders and Practices The Canadian Patient Safety Institute, HealthCareCAN and Health Standards Organization, with support from Patients for Patient Safety Canada, have partnered in the yearly recognition program that aims to identify, celebrate and disseminate leading practices in patient engagement for patient safety. Congratulations to the two teams selected by the Award Panel for their excellence. The Regional Medicine Program team from Eastern Health, Newfoundland The Bedside Handover Project has adjusted the delivery of patient information at the change of nursing shifts away from the nursing desk and brought it to the patient's bedside, resulting in patients feeling that they are more involved in their own care. The change has resulted in significant improvements on patient satisfaction surveys. Notably, in the post-implementation survey, 100% of patients felt nurses shared information about their case from one shift to another, up from 72% pre-implementation, and 91% felt nurses had involved patient families in making decisions about patient care, an increase from 66% pre-implementation. The project developed by the Regional Medicine Program (part of the CPSI Patient Engagement Collaborative), was implemented as a pilot project at Carbonear General Hospital. Led by Regional Medicine Program Managers Shannon Perry and Susan Newhook in partnership with patient advisors Julie Hollett and Dorothy Mary Senior, the project is a leading practice that empowers patients to become involved in their own care by moving the nurse handover process to the patient's bedside – a time when patients feel the most vulnerable. Read more here and in the HSO's Leading Practices Library Read More The Long-Term Care Yorkton team from Saskatchewan Health Authority, Saskatchewan The leading practice, dubbed "Family Engagement & Co-design in Measuring & Monitoring Safety", has led to a significant drop in the number of injuries – 42% drop in resident injuries and 69% reduction in staff injuries. It has also resulted in an incredible 83% reduction in the use of antipsychotics (without a diagnosis of psychosis). Led by Ms. Bellamy, Director of Continuing Care South East, in partnership with resident family member Adelle Kopp-McKay, the practice involves engaging with resident family members to challenge the care team to think broadly about harm and safety. This, along with collaborating closely with patients and family representatives helps promote the safe delivery of resident-and-family-centred care while building accountability at an individual, team and organizational level. Read more here and in the HSO's Leading Practices Library Read More In addition, teams from the following organizations have identified by the Award Panel as leading practices and added to HSO's Leading Practices Library. Congratulations to each of them! Alberta Health Services Achieving Exceptional Service Experience with Design Thinking BC Mental Health & Substance Use Services Partnerships in Care Huron Perth Healthcare Alliance Critical Care Indicator Flagging Program Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences Minimizing Harmful Coercive Practices in Mental Health Using Patient Engagement and Human Rights St. Joseph's Health Care London Improving Care Together Western Health Patient Driven Hand Hygiene Auditing CancerControl Alberta, Alberta Health Services My Care Conversations app Nova Scotia Health Authority Evolution of the Patient/Family Advisor Experience Markham Stouffville Hospital Falls Prevention Congratulations to all teams who submitted nominations this year. The Award Panel noted that each nomination was excellent and they were impressed by the progress made across Canada in advancing patient safety in partnership with patients. The call for nominations for the 2021 program will be announced in the Fall. We welcome your questions and suggestions at patients@cpsi-icsp.ca. To learn about the practices and leaders we celebrated in previous years click here. Recognizing Excellence in Patient Engagement for Patient Safety 2016 Champion Awards9/24/2020 8:05:50 AM13950https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/EventshtmlTrueaspx
Atlantic Learning Exchange2595General Patient SafetyEvents9/20/2016 6:01:00 PM Discover innovative and emerging trends in patient safety & quality improvement October 8 – 9, 2019 St. John's, NL, The Atlantic Health Quality and Patient Safety Collaborative (AHQPSC), through partnership support of the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI), welcomes you to attend this year's Atlantic Health Quality & Patient Safety Learning Exchange (ALE 2019) which will take place at the Sheraton Hotel Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, October 8 – 9, 2019. Program Who should attend? We look forward to welcoming innovative and engaged care providers, managers, health leaders, academics and students from university and college setting, as well as government representatives from the four Atlantic Provinces in attendance this year. Tickets are limited! Through this conference, you will be given an opportunity to Mobilize energy and enthusiasm for a new era of patient safety and quality improvement; Understand the role innovation and technology play in healthcare improvement; Stimulate change through the power of the patient voice; and Develop the skills for leading transformational change! Program Partners Sponsors Do you want to support this event? Do you want exclusive access to the front line of healthcare in the Atlantic provinces? We are looking for Sponsors and Exhibitors contact Gina Peck at 902-481-5034 or gpeck@cpsi-icsp.ca to receive more information on sponsorship and exhibiting at the conference. Atlantic Quality and Patient Safety Learning ExchangeDiscover innovative and emerging trends in patient safety & quality improvement October 8 – 9, 2019 St. John's, NL, The Atlantic Health10/29/2020 9:25:42 PM14508https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/EventshtmlTrueaspx
Home Care Safety2604Community Based Care;General Patient Safety;Improving Medication Safety;Healthcare HarmReports & Publications;Toolkits & Guides6/5/2014 8:48:12 PM With the release of the Safety at Home A Pan- Canadian Home Care Study (2013), the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) and the Canadian Home Care Association (CHCA) worked with the research team to translate the knowledge acquired from the study into tools, resources and programs for the field. Click on the following links to access resources available to home care providers, clients and families, and policy makers. Resources for home care providers Resources for family caregivers and clients Resources for policy makers and academics​ Home Care SafetyWith the release of the Safety at Home: A Pan- Canadian Home Care Study (2013) , the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) and the9/24/2020 8:14:05 AM7089https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Improvement Frameworks Getting Started Kit2605General Patient Safety;Healthcare HarmToolkits & Guides;Frameworks11/24/2011 4:21:24 PM12/2/2015 7:00:00 AM​​​​The Improvement Frameworks Getting Started Kit is intended to serve as a common document appended to the Safer Healthcare Now! Getting Started Kits. The goal is to help provide a consistent way for teams and individuals to approach the challenge of making changes that result in improvements. Download Improvement Frameworks Getting Started KitThe Improvement Frameworks Getting Started Kit is intended to serve as a common document appended to the Safer Healthcare Now! Getting Started9/24/2020 8:14:36 AM11812https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Patient Safety and Incident Management Toolkit2606General Patient Safety;Improving Medication Safety;Healthcare HarmToolkits & Guides12/18/2014 8:28:40 PMPrevent Patient Safety Incidents and Minimize Harm When They Do Occur When a patient's safety is compromised, or even if someone just comes close to having an incident, you need to know you are taking the right measures to address it, now and in the future. CPSI provides you with practical strategies and resources to manage incidents effectively and keep your patients safe. This integrated toolkit considers the needs and concerns of patients and their families, and how to properly engage them throughout the process. Drawn from the best available evidence and expert advice, this newly designed toolkit is for those responsible for managing patient safety, quality improvement, risk management, and staff training in any healthcare setting. Patient Safety Management Incident Management System Factors For more information, contact us at info@cpsi-icsp.ca.Toolkit Focus and Components The toolkit focuses on patient safety and incident management; it touches on ideas and resources for exploring the broader aspects of quality improvement and risk management. There are three sections to the toolkit Incident management—the actions that follow patient safety incidents (including near misses) Patient safety management—the actions that help to proactively anticipate patient safety incidents and prevent them from occurring System factors—the factors that shape and are shaped by patient safety and incident management (legislation, policies, culture, people, processes and resources). Visual representation of the toolkit. Incident management Resources to guide the immediate and ongoing actions following a patient safety incident (including near misses). We emphasize immediate response, disclosure, how to prepare for analysis, the analysis process, follow-through, how to close the loop and share learning. Patient safety management Resources to guide action before the incident (e.g., plan, anticipate, and monitor to respond to expected and unexpected safety issues) so care is safer today and in the future. We promote a patient safety culture and reporting and learning system. System factors Understanding the factors that shape both patient safety and incident management and identify actions to respond, align, and leverage them is crucial to patient safety. The factors come from different system levels (inside and outside the organization) and include legislation, policies, culture, people, processes and resources.Implementing Patient Safety and Incident Management Processes Consider the following guiding principles when applying the practical strategies and resources. Patient- and family-centred care. The patient and family are at the centre of all patient safety and incident management activities. Engage with patients and families throughout their care processes, as they are an equal partner and essential to the design, implementation, and evaluation of care and services. Safety culture. Culture refers to shared values (what is important) and beliefs (what is held to be true) that interact with a system's structures and control mechanisms to produce behavioural norms. An organization with a safety culture avoids, prevents, and mitigates patient safety risks at all levels. This includes a reporting and learning culture. System perspective. Keep patients safe by understanding and addressing the factors that contribute to an incident at all system levels, redesigning systems, and applying human factor principles. Develop the capability and capacity for effectively assessing the complex system to accurately identify weaknesses and strengths for preventing future incidents. Shared responsibilities. Teamwork is necessary for safe patient care, particularly at transitions in care. It is the best defence against system failures and should be actively fostered by all team members, including patients and families. In a functional teamwork environment, everyone is valued, empowered, and responsible for taking action to prevent patient safety incidents, including speaking up when they see practices that endanger safety.Resources to Support Patient Safety and Incident Management CPSI's toolkit resources are practical tools for patient safety and incident management, compiled with input from experts and contributing organizations. You may not require all of them when managing an incident, so please use your discretion in selecting the tools most appropriate for your needs.Toolkit Development and Maintenance CPSI accessed a variety of qualified experts and organizations to compile this practical and evidence-based toolkit. The process included Assigning a CPSI team with support from a writer with experience in the field Seeking advice from an expert faculty that included patient and family representatives Basing the content on the Canadian Incident Analysis Framework Engaging key stakeholders via focus groups and collecting evidence from peer-reviewed journals and publicly available literature The toolkit will be updated every year to keep it relevant. We welcome feedback on what is helpful, what can be improved, and content enhancements at info@cpsi-icsp.ca.Patient Safety and Incident Management ToolkitPrevent Patient Safety Incidents and Minimize Harm When They Do Occur When a patient's safety is compromised, or even if someone just comes close to10/8/2020 7:03:53 PM26173https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
The Canadian Surgical Site Infection Prevention Audit - Results 2608Surgical Care Safety;Infection Prevention & Control (IPAC)Events;Webinars;Reports & Publications8/31/2015 5:35:10 PM Surgical site infection is the most common healthcare associated infection among surgical patients, with 77 per cent of patient deaths reported to be related to infection. In February 2016, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) along with our partners Alberta Health Services-Surgery Strategic Clinical Network, Atlantic Health Quality & Patient Safety Collaborative, BC Patient Safety & Quality Council, Health Quality Ontario, and Saskatchewan Ministry of Health- Patient Safety Unit, conducted the Canadian Surgical Site Infection (SSI) Prevention Audit. Download Auditing helps to identify both areas of excellence and areas for improvement. During the month of February, all acute care organizations providing surgical services were challenged to audit their established processes for preventing surgical site infections (SSI). 52 service areas participated in the Surgical Site Infection Prevention Audit with 1.998 patient charts audited. Audit highlights noted that 91% of patients received appropriate prophylactic antibiotics and 96% of patients received the appropriate method of pre-operative hair removal whereas post-operative glucose control was identified as an area requiring improvement. To learn more about the Canadian Surgical Site Infection Prevention Audit and Results Click here for information regarding Audit Methodology Access the National Call Results from Canadian SSI Prevention Audit; March 24th, 2016 View the Canadian Surgical Site Infection Prevention Audit Recap Report Audit Recap Report The Canadian Surgical Site Infection Prevention Audit - Results Surgical site infection is the most common healthcare associated infection among surgical patients, with 77 per cent of patient deaths reported to be9/24/2020 8:16:44 AM3254https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
The Safety Competencies Framework2609General Patient Safety;Healthcare HarmReports & Publications;Frameworks4/14/2009 11:53:32 PMSafety Competencies Framework Educating healthcare providers about patient safety and enabling them to use the tools and knowledge to build and maintain a safe system is fundamental to creating a culture of safety across the spectrum of care. The 2020 Safety Competencies Framework (2nd Edition) is a simple, powerful and flexible framework that includes enabling competencies that can be adopted and adapted by diverse healthcare programs to design curricula to teach safety and quality for any sector or healthcare program. It can also be a valuable resource to policy makers, regulators and accreditors to guide system change. The Six Domains support moving patient safety evidence into action and has strengthened its content with advancements in collective knowledge that include patient/family partnership, leadership, quality improvement and cultural competency concepts. Safety Competencies Framework Domains Domain 1 Patient Safety Culture Patient safety culture improvement involves recognizing the importance of ongoing collaboration and the commitment to advocate for change. Domain 2 Teamwork High-performing interprofessional teams demonstrate capabilities and competencies that are essential to efficient, effective, and safe collaborative practice. Domain 3 Communication Effective communication is beneficial to patients and healthcare providers, builds trust, and is a precondition of obtaining patient consent. Domain 4 Safety, Risk, and Quality Improvement Healthcare providers collect and monitor performance data to assess risk and improve outcomes. Domain 5 Optimize Human and System Factors Optimizing the human and environmental factors that support the achievement of best human performance is an essential safety competency for all healthcare providers. Domain 6 Recognize, Respond to and Disclose Patient Safety Incidents Open, honest, and empathetic disclosure and appropriate apologies benefit patients and families, health providers, and their organizations. The Safety CompetenciesThe Safety Competencies: Message from the CEO12/3/2020 4:19:06 PM58061https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Suicide Risk2610Mental Health;Healthcare HarmToolkits & Guides;Reports & Publications4/21/2011 4:02:20 AMThe Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) has partnered with the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) to help healthcare workers and organizations select and compare available suicide risk assessment tools in Canada. For every death by suicide, 15-30 people are profoundly affected - this toolkit can help inform and strengthen the suicide risk assessment process. The Suicide Risk Assessment Toolkit seeks to provide a high-level overview of what to consider when using suicide risk assessment tools, along with a non-exhaustive list of available Canadian and international tools, and their characteristics. It is designed to be a quick, informative guide for healthcare workers and organizations interested in selecting and comparing such tools. The process of assessing suicide risk is complex. While assessment tools play an important role, they should be used to inform, not replace, clinical judgment. Use this toolkit, developed by CPSI and MHCC, to help you select/compare tools to complement the suicide risk assessment process. Download Toolkit (publication January 26, 2021) For a more comprehensive guide to suicide risk assessment, including the role of healthcare workers and organizations, see Suicide Risk Assessment Guide A Resource for Health Care Organizations. Download Guide (publication 2011) We acknowledge the need to have suicide risk assessment tools that are truly inclusive and are based on principles of equity and diversity. We encourage you to seek out opportunities to engage with diverse peoples, including First Nations, Inuit, Métis, people who identify as 2SLQBTQ+, and immigrant, refugee, ethnocultural and racialized groups in order to understand and respond to their specific needs. Sponsored by The Canadian Patient Safety Institute and the Mental Health Commission of Canada. Production of this toolkit has been made possible through a financial contribution from Health Canada. Suicide Risk Assessment - Toolkit and GuideThe Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) has partnered with the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) to help healthcare workers and2/4/2021 5:47:10 PM16850https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
The Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) Publications2611Infection Prevention & Control (IPAC)Reports & Publications12/3/2019 4:30:08 PM The Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) is a collaborative effort between the Public Health Agency of Canada's Centre for Communicable Diseases and Infection Control (CCDIC) and the National Microbiology Laboratory (NML), and sentinel hospitals across Canada who participate as members of the Canadian Hospital Epidemiology Committee (CHEC), a standing committee of the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease (AMMI) Canada. Established in 1994, the objectives of CNISP are to provide national and regional rates and trends on selected healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and antimicrobial resistant organisms (AROs), as well as provide key information that informs the development of federal, provincial and territorial infection prevention and control programs and policies. At present, 70 sentinel hospitals from 10 provinces and 1 territory participate in the CNISP network. Below are the definitions and protocols for the healthcare associated infections currently under surveillance by the CNISP. For protocols or documents not appearing below, contact CNISP cnisp-pcsin@phac-aspc.gc.ca Surveillance Definitions CNISP (Acute Care) HAI Surveillance Case definitions (2020) CNISP Surveillance Protocols COVID-19 and other viral respiratory infections (March 2021) Hospital Antibiogram Protocol (2020) Antimicrobial Utilization (AMU) Protocol (2020) Candida auris (C. auris) Protocol (2020) Carbapenemase-Producing Organisms (CPO) in CNISP Healthcare Facilities (2020) Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) Protocol (2020) Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infections (CLABSI) in Intensive Care Units (2020) Healthcare Acquired Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunt (CSF) Associated Infections (2021) Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA & MSSA) Bloodstream Infections in CNISP Hospitals (2021) Surgical Sites Infections Following Pediatric Cardiac Surgery (2020) Surgical Sites Infections Following Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty (2021) Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Bloodstream Infections in CNISP Hospitals (2020) Other Documents Canada Communicable Disease Report (Nosocomial Infection Surveillance, May 2020) CNISP Infographic Healthcare-associated infection rates in Canadian hospitals (2013-2017) CNISP Summary Report of Healthcare Associated Infection (HAI), Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) and Antimicrobial Use (AMU) Surveillance Data from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2017 Laboratory Surveillance 2019 Device-associated infections in Canadian acute-care hospitals from 2009 to 2018 The Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) PublicationsThe Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) is a collaborative effort between the Public Health Agency of Canada's Centre for12/1/2021 5:40:00 PM5219https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Report on the Integration of the Safety Competencies Framework2612General Patient Safety;Healthcare Harm;Improving CultureFrameworks;Reports & Publications9/12/2017 7:58:51 PM CPSI is pleased to present a comprehensive new report on the integration and impact of the Safety Competencies Framework (SCF) originally launched in 2008 in partnership with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. The framework has been one of the most downloaded documents on the CPSI website, consistently since its launch. Almost 10 years after the launch, this report examines the historical background of the SCF while providing a rationale for the development of the competencies, mapping of the competencies to integrate patient safety content in training programs. The report outlines the successes and challenges in the uptake of the competencies and includes a provocative call to action for educators. Several key findings were determined through interviews done with a select group of stakeholders familiar with the SCF and this feedback provided better understanding of the value of the competencies to organizations and professional bodies. As we look towards renewing the SCF to address feedback received, it is clear that despite the successes and challenges, we must shift our attention away from the "what" to focus on the "how" of integrating safety competencies in the curricula of health professionals on a more consistent basis. Download Report on the Integration of the Safety Competencies FrameworkCPSI is pleased to present a comprehensive new report on the integration and impact of the Safety Competencies Framework (SCF)9/24/2020 8:15:57 AM4586https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Results of 2018 Public Survey Related to the Labelling of Non-Prescription Health Products2613Improving Medication Safety;Government RelationsReports & Publications;Patient and Family Resource2/21/2019 3:31:22 PM As part of a Health Canada committee developing Plain Language Labelling regulations for non-prescription health products, Patients for Patient Safety Canada led a joint PFPSC and CPSI initiative to survey the public on the issue. Have people had problems with the labelling of non-prescription health products? The survey results indicate that consumers are often confused when purchasing self-care products. This raises concerns of harm are people choosing the wrong product because of this confusion? Our survey found that 29% of respondents said that they had wrongly purchased a natural health or homeopathic product, or over-the-counter drug; Another 29.5% said that they were not sure if they had wrongly purchased one of these products. The most cited reasons for the wrong purchase were Mixed it up with another product, Information about the product on the label was too small to read, or They were confused by, or did not understand, the information on the label. Some examples of comments on the survey include "I looked for Gravol on the drugstore shelf and all of the types of Gravol were together. When I saw Gravol ginger I thought it was Gravol with an added boost of ginger. When I got home and read the ingredients, I realized that there was not active ingredient in it. I feel I am a very health literate person, but I did not know the difference." "I did not realize the ingredients until I arrived home. Printing is so tiny on labels." "I bought a product for a yeast infection thinking it was for a Urinary Tract Infection" PFPSC represented members at the Health Canada table to ensure that "just like food products, all labels should be written in plain language, list all ingredients, and be printed in legible size." The results of this survey confirm that consumers want to know what's in the products they are taking. To protect Canadians from preventable harm, PFPSC and CPSI are calling for clear information and larger size lettering on the labels for non-prescription health products. Results of 2018 Public Survey Related to the Labelling of Non-Prescription Health Products  As part of a Health Canada committee developing Plain Language Labelling regulations for non-prescription health products, Patients for9/24/2020 8:16:23 AM2941https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
A Guide to Patient Safety Improvement2614General Patient SafetyToolkits & Guides7/29/2020 5:15:14 PM When it comes to patient safety, a substantial body of evidence exists to demonstrate interventions (leading practices and processes) that lead to improved patient outcomes for numerous healthcare conditions. Despite available evidence, practice changes are not implemented consistently and effectively to support organizations and teams to address patient safety challenges. This resource has been designed to support teams across all healthcare sectors in using a Knowledge Translation and Quality Improvement integrated approach to change that will impact patient safety outcomes. This Guide for Patient Safety Improvement is intended to accompany current best available evidence change ideas, and tools and resources for your specific project. It includes ideal practice changes “the what” and strategies “the how” that creates the evidence-based intervention. Adaptations are expected and important considerations for implementation will be provided in this guide. Download A Guide to Patient Safety ImprovementWhen it comes to patient safety, a substantial body of evidence exists to demonstrate interventions (leading practices and processes) that lead to10/15/2020 7:33:09 PM10195https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Engaging Patients in Patient Safety – a Canadian Guide2615General Patient SafetyToolkits & Guides;Reports & Publications4/25/2017 3:01:50 PM In recent decades, evidence has emerged that demonstrates when healthcare providers work closely with patients and their families, the healthcare system is safer, and patients have better experiences and health outcomes. Engagement with patients and families includes program and service design and delivery as well as monitoring, evaluating, policy and priority setting, and governance. Engagement work is not easy and often may be uncomfortable at first. Providers may need to let go of control, change behaviours to actively listen to what patients are saying, and take additional time to understand the patient perspective. It may require more effective ways to brainstorm ideas together, build trust, and incorporate many different perspectives. Patients may need to participate more actively in decisions about their care. Leaders must support all this work by revising practices to embed patient engagement in their procedures, policies, and structures. Finding innovative ways to work together will benefit everyone. We invite you to join us in advancing engagement by making healthcare safer. Our deep belief in the power of partnership is inspired by the publication, Engaging Patients in Patient Safety – a Canadian Guide. It is written by patients, providers and leaders for patients, providers and leaders. We trust that you will find the information in this guide useful. It demonstrates our joint commitment to achieving safe and quality healthcare in Canada. Download Better yet, bookmark this page. This resource is updated regularly. To ensure you are accessing the most up-to-date version, we recommend that you bookmark this page for future reference. Who is this guide for? The guide is for anyone involved with patient safety and interested in engagement, including Patients and families interested in how to partner in their own care to ensure safety Patient partners interested in how to help improve patient safety Providers interested in creating collaborative care relationships with patients and families Managers and leaders responsible for patient engagement, patient safety, and/or quality improvement Anyone else interested in partnering with patients to develop care programs and systems While the guide focuses primarily on patient safety, many engagement practices apply to other areas, including quality, research, and education. The guide is designed to support patient engagement across the healthcare sector. What is the purpose of the guide? The purpose of the guide is to help patients and families, providers and leaders work more effectively together to improve patient safety. The guide is an extensive resource that is based on evidence and leading practices. What is included in the guide? Evidence-based guidance Practical patient engagement practices Consolidated information, resources, and tools Supporting evidence and examples from across Canada Experiences from patients and families, providers, and leaders Probing questions about how to strengthen current approaches Strategies and policies to meet standards and organizational practice requirements Click here to learn how and why was the guide developed. ​ ​ ​ CitationPatient Engagement Action Team. 2017. Engaging Patients in Patient Safety – a Canadian Guide. Canadian Patient Safety Institute. Last modified December 2019. Available at www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/engagingpatients Engaging Patients in Patient Safety – a Canadian GuideIn recent decades, evidence has emerged that demonstrates when healthcare providers work closely with patients and their families, the healthcare10/8/2020 8:27:08 PM30000https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx