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Education to support mandatory ADR and MDI reporting (Vanessa’s Law)614Report;Patient and Family Resource;Guide3/4/2019 9:27:01 PM The Protecting Canadians from Unsafe Drugs Act, also known as Vanessa's Law, is intended to increase drug and medical device safety in Canada by strengthening Health Canada's ability to collect information and to take quick and appropriate action when a serious health risk is identified. It will be mandatory for hospitals to report serious adverse drug reactions (serious ADRs) and medical device incidents (MDIs) to Health Canada, effective December 16, 2019. Downloadable from this webpage are 4 PowerPoint modules that contain core content intended for use by hospitals, health care professionals, patients and their families, and educators, to explain, describe, or promote the reporting of serious ADRs and MDIs. Module 1 – Overview of Vanessa's Law and Reporting Requirements PowerPoint - Module 1 | PDF Module 2 – Reporting Processes to Health Canada PowerPoint - Module 2 | PDF Module 3 – Strategies to Promote and Support Mandatory Reporting PowerPoint - Module 3 | PDF Module 4 – Health Canada's Review and Communication of Safety Findings PowerPoint - Module 4 | PDF These materials (as entire modules or as individual slides or selected content) can be used for individual learning or incorporated into presentations, orientation, continuing education, and other information-sharing activities. The materials can be used in the following ways to support and raise awareness of mandatory reporting requirements Hospitals can include some or all of the content in their local, regional, and/or provincial information-sharing activities (e.g., "Lunch and Learn" sessions, presentations, orientation programs for new staff). Educators in the health care sector can use the content in presentations or as part of a curriculum. Professional associations, societies, and regulatory colleges, as well as other training institutions for health care workers, may incorporate the content of the modules into accredited courses or continuing education certification programs. Patient and consumer organizations can help disseminate some or all of the information in the modules to increase awareness and knowledge among their members. If you have questions about how to use these educational materials for your specific audience (e.g., selecting slides or content from several modules to create a customized presentation), please contact ISMP Canada info@ismpcanada.ca HSO https//healthstandards.org/ CPSI info@cpsi-icsp.ca ​If you have questions about Vanessa's Law and the mandatory reporting requirements, please contact hc.canada.vigilance.sc@canada.ca. This conceptual model of serious ADR and MDI reporting by hospitals depicts the information provided in the 4 PowerPoint modules mandatory reporting requirements, reporting processes to Health Canada, strategies to promote and support reporting, and Health Canada’s review and communication of safety findings. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Health Canada, ISMP Canada, HSO, and CPSI gratefully acknowledge input received from the Advisory Panel (listed in alphabetical order) Glenn Cox, Senior Director Pharmacy Services NSHA, Director Pharmacy Services, Cape Breton/Antigonish/Guysborough, Cape Breton Regional Hospital, Sydney, NS ; Michael Gaucher, Director Pharmaceuticals & Health Workforce Information Services, Canadian Institute for Health Information, Ottawa, ON ; Andrew Ibey – Clinical Engineer, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, ON ; Denis Lebel – Pharmacien, adjoint aux soins, enseignement et recherche, Département de pharmacie, CHU Sainte-Justine, QC ; Dr. Joel Lexchin, Professor Emeritus, School of Health Policy & Management, York University, Toronto, ON ; Faith Louis, Regional Manager, Quality Improvement & Support Services, Pharmacy Services, Horizon Health Network, NB; Holly Meyer, Provincial Director, Product Quality & Safety, Alberta Health Services, AB ; Maryann V. Murray, Patients for Patient Safety Canada; Tolu Oyebode, Government of Saskatchewan, Senior Project Manager, Patient Safety Unit, Strategic Priorities Branch, Ministry of Health, SK ; Sheryl Peterson, Associate Director, Lecturer, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of British Columbia (Vancouver Campus); Michelle Rossi, Director, Policy and Strategy, Health Quality Ontario, Toronto, ON ; Myrella Roy, Executive Director, and Cathy Lyder, Director Professional Practice, Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists, Ottawa, ON ; Christelle Sessua, Quality Assurance-Risk Management Coordinator, Iqaluit Health Services, Department of Health, Government of Nunavut ; Robyn Tamblyn, James McGill Chair, Professor, Department of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, McGill University, Scientific Director, Institute of Health Services and Policy Research, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Montreal, QC ; Annemarie Taylor, Executive Director, Patient Safety & Learning System, Vancouver, British Columbia ; Terence Young, Chair of Drug Safety Canada and father of Vanessa Young. Educational Support for Mandatory Reporting of Serious ADRs and MDIs by HospitalsThe  Protecting Canadians from Unsafe Drugs Act , also known as Vanessa's Law, is intended to1/22/2020 5:13:45 PM25672https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Creating a Safe Space: Addressing the Psychological Safety of Healthcare Workers69221Toolkits1/6/2020 4:59:11 PM The Creating a Safe Space Addressing the Psychological Safety of Healthcare Workers manuscript provides a comprehensive overview of what peer support is available in Canada and internationally. It outlines best practice guidelines, tools and resources, to assist policy makers, accreditation bodies, regulators and healthcare leaders assess what healthcare workers need in terms of support, and to create a peer-to-peer support program (PSPs) to help them improve their emotional well-being and allow them to provide the best and safest care to their patients. A provider support program will enable healthcare professionals to re-establish or improve their previous levels of work performance and improve patient safety. Provider programs should not only be designed to simply help the provider, but also to improve the system and help make patient care safe. The walking wounded, the silent mistake, the loss of providers all contribute to lost opportunities for, and potential liabilities to patient safety. This manuscript is a comprehensive guide and toolkit to provide Canadian healthcare organizations with the resources they need to develop and sustain a peer-to-peer support program. Download Creating a Safe Space: Psychological Safety of Healthcare WorkersThe Creating a Safe Space: Addressing the Psychological Safety of Healthcare Workers manuscript provides a comprehensive overview of what1/13/2020 8:20:30 PM753https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Advocacy and support for use of a Surgical Safety Checklist68992Position Statements2/5/2019 7:55:32 PMPosition StatementA Surgical Safety Checklist is smart for patients and smart for providers. It's use in Canadian healthcare facilities is endorsed by a Position Statement supported by many surgical interest groups. ​Healthcare professionals must make every reasonable effort to provide safe care to their patients. The purpose of this statement is to express the commitment of the undersigned organizations to prioritize perioperative patient safety by creating an environment conducive to the effective adoption and use of a Surgical Safety Checklist. Download Advocacy and support for use of a Surgical Safety ChecklistPosition Statement A Surgical Safety Checklist is smart for patients and smart for providers. It's use in Canadian healthcare facilities2/5/2019 8:17:32 PM965https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Tools & Resources350663/25/2009 3:33:37 PM​​​​​​​​​ Tools & ResourcesTools & Resources7/19/2019 9:14:54 PM35801https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/enhtmlTrueaspx
Events35071Events6/4/2015 6:09:31 AM ​​Events11/18/2019 8:17:17 PM9651https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/enhtmlTrueaspx
Introduction of the Measuring and Monitoring of Safety (Vincent) Framework to Canada38928Events;Presentation;Metrics1/4/2017 4:11:25 PM Archive Monday, January 30, 2017 at 1000 am MST / 1200 pm EST Purpose of the Call "…if I apply this [framework] conceptually to any problem I've got in safety I can make it work, and it orders my thinking" – Neil Prentice, Assistant Medical Director Mental Health, Tayside Trust, Scotland In Canada, as in the UK and US the focus of governments on assessing both quality and safety has increased over the past 10 years.[1],[2] A very large number of quality outcomes have been specified but the approach to safety has been much narrower, leaving many aspects of safety unexplored.[3] The measurement of harm, so important in the evolution of patient safety, has been largely neglected[4] and there have been prominent calls for improved measures.[5] There is a critical need for patient safety measurement at the front lines, so that clinical teams can focus on key problems. Don Berwick has stated that 'most health care organisations at present have very little capacity to analyse, monitor, or learn from safety and quality information. This gap is costly and should be closed. Early warning signals can be valued and should be maintained and heeded'.5,[7] In 2013 Professors Charles Vincent, Susan Burnett and Jane Carthey published their report The Measuring and Monitoring of Safety[8] which describes their framework to be implemented in practice to close the gap identified by Berwick. The framework provides a broader view of the information needed to create and sustain safer care. Objectives Introduce the Measuring and Monitoring of Safety Framework to a Canadian healthcare audience Describe how the framework would work in Canada Resources Video Presentation A framework for measuring and monitoring safety A practical guide to using a new framework for measuring and monitoring safety in the NHS (2014) - Download the guide from The Health Foundation The measurement and monitoring of safety Drawing together academic evidence and practical experience to produce a framework for safety measurement and monitoring (2013) – Download the full report from The Health Foundation Speaker Biographies Professor Charles Vincent Professor Charles Vincent is trained as a clinical psychologist and has worked in the British NHS for several years. Since 1985 he has focused on conducting research on the causes of harm to patients, the consequences for patients and staff and methods of improving the safety of healthcare. He established the Clinical Risk Unit at the Department of Psychology, University College London where he was Professor of Psychology. In 2002 he moved to become Professor of Clinical Safety Research in the Department of Surgery and Cancer at Imperial College in 2002. From 1999 to 2003 he was a Commissioner on the UK Commission for Health Improvement. He has acted as an advisor on patient safety in many inquiries and committees including the Bristol Inquiry, the Parliamentary Health Select Committee, the Francis Inquiry and the Berwick Review. From 2007 to 2013 he was the Director of the National Institute of Health Research Centre for Patient Safety & Service Quality at Imperial College. He moved to the Department of Experimental Psychology in January 2014 with the support of the Health Foundation to continue his work on safety in healthcare. G. Ross Baker, Ph.D. G. Ross Baker, Ph.D., is a professor in the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto and Director of the MSc. Program in Quality Improvement and Patient Safety. Ross is co-lead for a large quality improvement-training program in Ontario, IDEAS (improving and Driving Excellence Across Sectors). Recent research projects include a review and synthesis of evidence on factors linked to high performing healthcare systems, an analysis of why progress on patient safety has been slower than expected and an edited book of case studies on patient engagement strategies. Chris Power What began as a desire to help those in need 30 years ago has evolved into a mission to improve the quality of healthcare for all Canadians. Chris Power's journey in healthcare began at the bedside as a front-line nurse. Since then, she has grown into one of the preeminent healthcare executives in Canada. Her experiences, her success, and her values have led her to the position of CEO of the Canadian Patient Safety Institute. Previously, Chris served for eight years as president and CEO of Capital Health, Nova Scotia, with an annual operating budget of approximately $900 million, and 12,000 staff. Under Chris’s leadership Capital Health achieved Accreditation with Exemplary Status in 2014 with recognition for 10 Leading Practices.​ SHIFT to Safety Ensuring patients are safe remains a major challenge for Canadian healthcare organisations and systems. The Canadian Patient Safety Institute's (CPSI) new initiative, SHIFT to Safety, has been launched to address these challenges, including helping providers and leaders improve their measurement efforts. References [1] Baker, G Ross, Beyond the quick fix – Strategies for improving patient safety. Institute of Health Policy Management and Evaluation. Nov.9.2015 [2] Darzi A. High quality care for all. London Department of Health, 2009. [3] Quality and Outcomes Framework 2013/14. London Department of Health, 2013. [4] Vincent CA, Aylin P, Franklin BD, et al. Is health care getting safer? BMJ 2008;3371205–07. [5] Francis R. Independent Inquiry into care provided by Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust January 2005–March 2009. London Department of Health, 2013. [6] Jha A, Pronovost P. Toward a safer health care system The critical need to improve measurement. JAMA. 2016. [7] Berwick DM. A promise to learn—a commitment to act. Improving the safety of patients in England. London Department of Health, 2013 [8] Vincent CA, Burnett S, Carthey C. The measurement and monitoring of safety in healthcare. London Health Foundation, 2013Archive: Monday, January 30, 2017 at 10:00 am MST / 12:00 pm EST Purpose of the Call: "…if I apply this3/11/2019 4:45:52 PM3239https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Pages/Forms/NewDefaultView.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Suicide Risk36602Guide;Publication4/21/2011 4:02:20 AM ​​​We are pleased to announce that Dr. Chris Perlman, associate director, Homewood Research Institute, and his team are the successful recipients of Ontario Hospital Association (OHA) and Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) funding to develop an inventory and resource guide for assessing and preventing suicide risk. Among its many accomplishments, Homewood Research Institute, located in Guelph, Ontario, was a lead organization in the development of mental health assessment systems, such as the Resident Assessment Instrument – Mental Health (RAI-MH), the interRAI Community Mental Health, and the interRAI Emergency Screener for Psychiatry. The five-member team—Dr. Chris Perlman, Dr. John Hirdes, Dr. Lynn Martin, Dr. Eva Neufeld, and Ms. Mary Goy—includes researchers, policy analysts, and clinicians with more than 20 years of experience conducting health and policy research at the regional, provincial, national, and international levels. All team members have tremendous expertise in mental health research. Dr. Perlman and his team will be working closely with the Advisory Group and with members of the OHA and CPSI to develop the inventory and resource guide. The innovative guide will be available by fall 2011. Download Inventory and Resource Guide Development for the Assessment and Prevention of Suicide RiskWe are pleased to announce that Dr. Chris Perlman, associate director, Homewood Research Institute, and his team are the successful recipients of11/9/2016 5:59:18 PM4104https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Conquer Silence – Ask the right questions about your medications2248Checklists;Patient and Family Resource10/25/2019 4:05:46 PM Thank you for listening to stories and advice on reducing healthcare harm from real people at ConquerSilence.ca. When any changes are made to your or your loved one’s medications (starting, stopping or changing doses) - especially when on multiple medications - there may be a risk of adverse drug reactions or errors. The Canadian Patient Safety Institute has teamed up with the Institute for Safe Medications Practices Canada, Patients for Patient Safety Canada, the Canadian Pharmacists Association, and the Canadian Society for Hospital Pharmacists to create this list of questions to help you start a conversation about medications with your healthcare provider. Together with your doctor, homecare nurse, or pharmacist, you can help Conquer Silence and keep yourself and your loved ones safe. Download Sign up to for the Conquer Silence mailing list to be notified when we feature different patient safety issues, add new resources, and ask you to help us evaluate the effectiveness of this campaign. Thank you for listening to stories and advice on reducing healthcare harm from real people at ConquerSilence.ca . When any changes are made to10/25/2019 5:44:28 PM1300https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/5-Questions-to-Ask-about-your-Medications/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Conquer Silence – Encourage your patients to ask the right questions about their medications2249Checklists10/25/2019 4:33:20 PM Thank you for listening to stories and advice on reducing healthcare harm from real people at ConquerSilence.ca. When you or another healthcare provider make changes to patient’s medications (starting, stopping or changing doses) - especially when the patient is on multiple medications - there may be a risk of adverse drug reactions or errors. The Canadian Patient Safety Institute has teamed up with the Institute for Safe Medications Practices Canada, Patients for Patient Safety Canada, the Canadian Pharmacists Association, and the Canadian Society for Hospital Pharmacists to create this list of questions to help your patients have conversations about medications with you. Engaging patients in the healthcare journey reduces the chances of preventable harm. Please encourage your patients to ask you and other healthcare providers these 5 Questions. Download Sign up to for the Conquer Silence mailing list to be notified when we feature different patient safety issues, add new resources, and ask you to help us evaluate the effectiveness of this campaign.Thank you for listening to stories and advice on reducing healthcare harm from real people at ConquerSilence.ca . When you or another10/25/2019 5:45:10 PM1193https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/5-Questions-to-Ask-about-your-Medications/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Fact Sheets About Hand Hygiene38903Toolkits;Guide6/3/2015 4:46:57 PM ​Get the information you need about hand hygiene quickly and conveniently. Please share this information with your colleagues. The Need for Better Hand Hygiene If Hands Could Talk​ Antimicrobial Resistance and MRSA in Canada Proper Hand Hygiene Technique How to Handrub How to Handwash Hand, Skin, and Nail CareGet the information you need about hand hygiene quickly and conveniently. Please share this information with your colleagues. The Need for11/28/2016 5:59:41 PM6580https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Pages/Forms/NewDefaultView.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Advisory Council on the Implementation of National Pharmacare Community Dialogue40077Events10/22/2018 3:47:43 PM Date and TimeWed, November 7, 2018630 PM – 830 PM ASTLocation Bluenose Ballroom, Delta Halifax Hotel by Marriott (downtown) – Attached to Scotia Square parkade,1990 Barrington Street Halifax, NS B3J 1P2 In Budget 2018, the Federal Government announced the creation of an Advisory Council on the Implementation of National Pharmacare. The Council will assess options and provide independent advice to the Minister of Health and the Minister of Finance on how best to implement national pharmacare in a manner that is affordable for Canadians, employers and governments. The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) is hosting a community dialogue on this topic, on behalf of the Council. The session will include a short introduction from the Council, and a chance for participants to share ideas and perspectives. What should our approach to national pharmacare be? Who should be covered and how should it be implemented? Which medications should be covered? Who would pay for the plan? The Council wants to hear from you on this important topic. Speakers include Dr. Eric Hoskins Chair, Advisory Council on the Implementation of National Pharmacare The Canadian Patient Safety Institute would like to acknowledge funding support from Health Canada. The views expressed here do not necessarily represent the views of Health Canada. Date and Time: Wed, November 7, 2018 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM AST Location: Bluenose Ballroom, Delta Halifax8/20/2019 4:04:23 PM716https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/Events/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Atlantic Learning Exchange36691Events9/20/2016 6:01:00 PM Discover innovative and emerging trends in patient safety & quality improvement October 8 – 9, 2019 St. John's, NL, The Atlantic Health Quality and Patient Safety Collaborative (AHQPSC), through partnership support of the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI), welcomes you to attend this year's Atlantic Health Quality & Patient Safety Learning Exchange (ALE 2019) which will take place at the Sheraton Hotel Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, October 8 – 9, 2019. Program Who should attend? We look forward to welcoming innovative and engaged care providers, managers, health leaders, academics and students from university and college setting, as well as government representatives from the four Atlantic Provinces in attendance this year. Tickets are limited! Through this conference, you will be given an opportunity to Mobilize energy and enthusiasm for a new era of patient safety and quality improvement; Understand the role innovation and technology play in healthcare improvement; Stimulate change through the power of the patient voice; and Develop the skills for leading transformational change! Program Registration Fees Registration $275 Student Registration $199* Register Now *Spaces are limited for student registration. Student ID is required. Conference fees include full conference with light breakfast and lunch provided.Venue & Hotel Accommodations The conference will be taking place at the Sheraton Hotel Newfoundland located at 115 Cavendish Square in St. Johns Newfoundland. For guests that require accommodations, a room block has been reserved for attendees at the Sheraton Hotel Newfoundland starting at $164 a night for a standard room. Guests can use the booking link below or can call/email to do reserve a room for the conference. When booking via phone or email use reference code “Atlantic Learning Exchange”. Email reservations@sheratonhotelnewfoundland.com Call Local 709-726-4980 or Toll Free 1-888-870-3033 Book Hotel Room Now Partners Sponsors Do you want to support this event? Do you want exclusive access to the front line of healthcare in the Atlantic provinces? We are looking for Sponsors and Exhibitors contact Gina Peck at 902-481-5034 or gpeck@cpsi-icsp.ca to receive more information on sponsorship and exhibiting at the conference. Atlantic Quality and Patient Safety Learning ExchangeDiscover innovative and emerging trends in patient safety & quality improvement October 8 – 9, 2019 St. John's, NL, The Atlantic Health10/2/2019 3:07:21 PM8236https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/EventshtmlTrueaspx
Section 3: Confidentiality and Legal Privilege for Peer Support Programs34392Toolkits1/6/2020 9:17:29 PM While patients and families will always be the first priority in healthcare, workers also need to be supported as a result of what they experience in their profession. Peer support programs, where healthcare workers can discuss their experiences in a non-judgmental environment with colleagues who can relate to what they are going through, are now seen as a useful approach to helping them cope. A number of support programs are emerging, as healthcare organizations are beginning to recognize that this is an appropriate and valuable service for their staff. This section is a key resource for organizations who are planning a peer support program, as it gives clear explanations about what is and is not privileged information, and how best to strengthen confidentiality. It was informed by a team of lawyers, physicians and a patient advocate who had extensive experience with the issue of confidentiality in healthcare. Download While patients and families will always be the first priority in healthcare, workers also need to be supported as a result of what they experience in1/6/2020 10:07:44 PM119https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Creating-a-Safe-Space-Psychological-Safety-of-Healthcare-Workers/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
A Framework for Establishing a Patient Safety Culture36622Framework2/14/2018 4:54:19 PMPatient Safety Culture "Bundle" for CEOs/Senior Leaders What is the Patient Safety Culture "Bundle"? Strengthening a safety culture necessitates interventions that simultaneously enable, enact and elaborate in a way that is attuned to the existing culture. Through a literature review of more than 60 resources, a Patient Safety Culture Bundle has been created and validated through interviews with Canadian thought leaders. The Bundle is based on a set of evidence-based practices that must all be applied in order to deliver good care. All components are required to improve the patient safety culture. The Patient Safety Culture "Bundle" for CEOs and Senior Leaders encompasses key concepts of safety science, implementation science, just culture, psychological safety, staff safety/health, patient and family engagement, disruptive behavior, high reliability/resilience, patient safety measurement, frontline leadership, physician leadership, staff engagement, teamwork/communication, and industry-wide standardization/alignment. Download a one-pager of the Patient Safety Culture Bundle for CEOs/Senior Leaders Why was this Bundle created? A patient safety culture is difficult to operationalize. Improving safety requires an organizational culture that enables and prioritizes patient safety. The importance of culture change needs to be brought to the forefront, rather than taking a backseat to other safety activities. The National Patient Safety Consortium Education Working Group verified the critical role senior leadership plays in ensuring patient safety is an organizational priority. A Working group of partners, led by the Canadian Patient Safety Institute, Canadian College of Health Leaders (CCHL), HealthCareCAN and the Healthcare Insurance Reciprocal of Canada (HIROC) were brought together to establish a framework and advance this work. How can I use the Patient Safety Culture Bundle? The key components required for a Patient Safety Culture are identified under three pillars ENABLING ENACTING LEARNING Within each pillar you will find links to valuable tools and resources to help your efforts in establishing and sustaining a patient safety culture. (coming soon)Are you looking to establish and sustain a culture of safety? We are committed to providing a robust framework to advance a safety culture. The Bundle is a dynamic tool that will be continually updated. We invite you to check back often for more links and resources. We also need your participation and input to ensure the Bundle is current and relevant. Please forward any links or comments to info@cpsi-icsp.ca. Testimonials "Patient safety and healthcare quality are advanced when boards and senior leaders are committed to it and are able to show evidence of that commitment. Missing until now is a concise "how to" guide. The Patient Safety bundle for Leaders fills that gap." Catherine Gaulton, CEO, HIROC "Leadership is critical to developing a patient safety culture and building leadership capacity requires a vision of the knowledge, skills and behaviours necessary to achieve this. The Patient Safety Leadership Bundle provides this and will be a practical tool for health leaders across the healthcare continuum to assess their personal capabilities. It will also provide both organizations and the system, as a whole, a checklist for what's missing from our collective leadership education toolkits so that we can strategically respond to these needs. HealthCareCAN is committed to the spread of this tool across the country as part of a cultural shift to safety and a drive towards high-reliability culture." Dale Schierbeck, Vice-President, Learning & Development, HealthCareCAN and Co-Chair, Patient Safety Education for Leaders Working A Framework for Establishing a Patient Safety CulturePatient Safety Culture "Bundle" for CEOs/Senior Leaders What is the Patient Safety Culture "Bundle"? Strengthening a safety4/4/2019 2:29:25 PM7245https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Canadian Patient Safety Week (CPSW)36688Events12/8/2009 9:50:43 PMWelcome to your home for Canadian Patient Safety Week! #ConquerSilence Canadian Patient Safety Week runs October 28 to November 1, 2019. The Canadian Patient Safety Institute invites all Canadians – the public, providers and leaders – to become involved in making patient safety a priority. Printed packages are available for order while supplies last and include posters, buttons, other promotional materials, plus tips and resources for running a terrific CPSW event at your organization! Quantities are limited – 500 English packages and 100 French packages. Click HERE to be directed to the online store. Order Now Conquer Silence At some point, every one of us will be a patient in the healthcare system. What most Canadians don’t realize, is that 28,000 of us die from preventable harm when receiving care, every single year. This makes patient safety incidents the third leading cause of death in Canada, behind cancer and heart disease. One in three Canadians has had patient harm affect themselves or a loved one, yet the public is collectively unaware that the problem exists. This is a silent epidemic. If we do nothing, 1.2 million Canadians will die from preventable patient harm in the next 30 years. What we must battle in our collective efforts to reduce patient harm, is systemic silence. Silence between patients and providers, between colleagues in healthcare facilities, between administrators in different regions, and between the public and policymakers. If something looks wrong, feels wrong, or is wrong – we need people to speak up, in the moment. It is only by bringing these issues to light that we can begin to work together to solve them. During this year’s Canadian Patient Safety Week, join us in sharing your story and your advice on how to reduce patient harm at ConquerSilence.ca. ​Canadian Patient Safety Week EventsShare your patient safety story and your advice on how to reduce harm at conquersilence.ca New episode of our award winning PATIENT podcasts #ConquerSilence Webinar Creating a Safe Space Webinar Mandatory Reporting (Protecting Canadians from Unsafe Drugs Act) Webinar Please explore the Canadian Patient Safety Week links for Tools & Resources, including our upcoming communications toolkit and tools to improve patient safety. Discover stories of overcoming silence in our award-winning podcast series, PATIENT. We will continue to add new content. About Canadian Patient Safety Week is a national, annual campaign that started in 2005 to inspire extraordinary improvement in patient safety and quality. As the momentum for promoting best practices in patient safety has grown, so has the participation in Canadian Patient Safety Week. Canadian Patient Safety week is relevant to anyone who engages with our healthcare system providers, patients, and citizens. Working together, thousands help spread the message to Conquer Silence. Sponsors Sponsorship The Canadian Patient Safety Institute invites you to join our network of Canadians – the public, healthcare providers and healthcare leaders – in making patient safety a priority. If your organization is interested in sponsoring CPSW 2019, please contact dcostigan@cpsi-icsp.ca. Do you have any questions or suggestions? Contact CPSI CommunicationsPhone (780) 409-8090 Toll free 1-866-421-6933 Email CPSW@cpsi-icsp.ca Join the conversation at #ConquerSilence Canadian Patient Safety WeekCanadian Patient Safety Week (CPSW)1/8/2020 7:41:47 PM52934https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/EventshtmlTrueaspx
Am I Safe?36645Report7/13/2016 9:39:51 PM It's time to have a conversation about safety in the home Choosing to receive care at home is an important decision to make. Being aware of and understanding potential risks to safety is a big part of receiving home care for patients, their families and care providers. Talking openly and honestly as a healthcare team is important —before, during, and after care appointments. In 2015, CPSI worked with the Canadian Home Care Association to find tools and resources to guide safety conversations between health care providers and patients when receiving home care services. The result was the Am I Safe? report. Download Am I Safe? helps healthcare providers, patients, and caregivers work together to evaluate and manage risk when receiving care at home. Understanding and accepting "what is safe" means balancing the patient's and family's understanding of risk with the healthcare provider's knowledge and perception of acceptable risk. If all parties involved can have the right conversations, establish trust, share information and knowledge, and support one another, they greatly increase their chances of successful, safe care in the home. The next phase of Am I Safe? begins now. We want to discover and test resources to support safety conversations in the home. If you are using a tool or are aware of a tool that could facilitate conversations around safety in the home, please contact us at AMISAFE@cpsi-icsp.ca or info@cpsi-icsp.ca.Am I Safe?It's time to have a conversation about safety in the home Choosing to receive care at home is an important decision to make. Being aware of and4/5/2017 7:21:23 PM1969https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
What the public needs to know about Vanessa's Law1046Report8/15/2019 8:37:49 PM ​ The Protecting Canadians from Unsafe Drugs Act, also known as Vanessa's Law, is intended to increase drug and medical device safety in Canada by strengthening Health Canada's ability to collect information and to take quick and appropriate action when a serious health risk is identified. It will be mandatory for hospitals to report serious adverse drug reactions (serious ADRs) and medical device incidents (MDIs) to Health Canada, effective December 16, 2019. Patients for Patient Safety Canada (PFPSC) created a presentation to help patients and the public understand and promote the reporting of serious adverse drug reactions and medical device incidents. Download the patient module This module can be used in presentations and other information-sharing activities. Please share the link to this page with anyone who you think needs to know about the new requirements for reporting to improve safety.    The presentation was adapted from 4 core PowerPoint modules developed in collaboration with Health Canada. Access the core modules If you have questions about how to use these educational materials for your specific audience please contact patients@cpsi-icsp.ca ​If you have questions about Vanessa's Law and the mandatory reporting requirements, please contact hc.canada.vigilance.sc@canada.ca. Why we need Vanessa’s Law By Brendan Gribbons of Lower Mainland Biomedical Engineering Consistent voluntary reporting followed by a thorough multi-incident analysis identified quickly a defect in IV tubing that resulted in a voluntary global recall of over 100 million IV tubing sets. Numerous alerts were generated regarding the uncontrolled flow, including from Health Canada and the manufacturer. This success story from British Columbia shows how Vanessa’s law can prevent harm. (This blog is in English only.) The  Protecting Canadians from Unsafe Drugs Act , also known as Vanessa's Law, is intended to increase drug and medical device safety in9/12/2019 9:32:18 PM7206https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Vanessas-Law/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Home Care Safety36594Report;Research;Toolkits6/5/2014 8:48:12 PM With the release of the Safety at Home A Pan- Canadian Home Care Study (2013), the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) and the Canadian Home Care Association (CHCA) worked with the research team to translate the knowledge acquired from the study into tools, resources and programs for the field. Click on the following links to access resources available to home care providers, clients and families, and policy makers. Resources for home care providers Resources for family caregivers and clients Resources for policy makers and academics​ Home Care SafetyWith the release of the Safety at Home: A Pan- Canadian Home Care Study (2013) , the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) and the6/29/2016 8:24:53 PM2175https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Improvement Frameworks Getting Started Kit36595Toolkits;Getting Started Kit;Framework11/24/2011 4:21:24 PM12/2/2015 7:00:00 AM​​​​The Improvement Frameworks Getting Started Kit is intended to serve as a common document appended to the Safer Healthcare Now! Getting Started Kits. The goal is to help provide a consistent way for teams and individuals to approach the challenge of making changes that result in improvements. Download Improvement Frameworks Getting Started KitThe Improvement Frameworks Getting Started Kit is intended to serve as a common document appended to the Safer Healthcare Now! Getting Started1/5/2016 6:18:07 PM4002https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Patient Safety and Incident Management Toolkit36596Toolkits12/18/2014 8:28:40 PMPrevent Patient Safety Incidents and Minimize Harm When They Do Occur When a patient's safety is compromised, or even if someone just comes close to having an incident, you need to know you are taking the right measures to address it, now and in the future. CPSI provides you with practical strategies and resources to manage incidents effectively and keep your patients safe. This integrated toolkit considers the needs and concerns of patients and their families, and how to properly engage them throughout the process. Drawn from the best available evidence and expert advice, this newly designed toolkit is for those responsible for managing patient safety, quality improvement, risk management, and staff training in any healthcare setting. Patient Safety Management Incident Management System Factors For more information, contact us at info@cpsi-icsp.ca.Toolkit Focus and Components The toolkit focuses on patient safety and incident management; it touches on ideas and resources for exploring the broader aspects of quality improvement and risk management. There are three sections to the toolkit Incident management—the actions that follow patient safety incidents (including near misses) Patient safety management—the actions that help to proactively anticipate patient safety incidents and prevent them from occurring System factors—the factors that shape and are shaped by patient safety and incident management (legislation, policies, culture, people, processes and resources). Visual representation of the toolkit. Incident management Resources to guide the immediate and ongoing actions following a patient safety incident (including near misses). We emphasize immediate response, disclosure, how to prepare for analysis, the analysis process, follow-through, how to close the loop and share learning. Patient safety management Resources to guide action before the incident (e.g., plan, anticipate, and monitor to respond to expected and unexpected safety issues) so care is safer today and in the future. We promote a patient safety culture and reporting and learning system. System factors Understanding the factors that shape both patient safety and incident management and identify actions to respond, align, and leverage them is crucial to patient safety. The factors come from different system levels (inside and outside the organization) and include legislation, policies, culture, people, processes and resources.Implementing Patient Safety and Incident Management Processes Consider the following guiding principles when applying the practical strategies and resources. Patient- and family-centred care. The patient and family are at the centre of all patient safety and incident management activities. Engage with patients and families throughout their care processes, as they are an equal partner and essential to the design, implementation, and evaluation of care and services. Safety culture. Culture refers to shared values (what is important) and beliefs (what is held to be true) that interact with a system's structures and control mechanisms to produce behavioural norms. An organization with a safety culture avoids, prevents, and mitigates patient safety risks at all levels. This includes a reporting and learning culture. System perspective. Keep patients safe by understanding and addressing the factors that contribute to an incident at all system levels, redesigning systems, and applying human factor principles. Develop the capability and capacity for effectively assessing the complex system to accurately identify weaknesses and strengths for preventing future incidents. Shared responsibilities. Teamwork is necessary for safe patient care, particularly at transitions in care. It is the best defence against system failures and should be actively fostered by all team members, including patients and families. In a functional teamwork environment, everyone is valued, empowered, and responsible for taking action to prevent patient safety incidents, including speaking up when they see practices that endanger safety.Resources to Support Patient Safety and Incident Management CPSI's toolkit resources are practical tools for patient safety and incident management, compiled with input from experts and contributing organizations. You may not require all of them when managing an incident, so please use your discretion in selecting the tools most appropriate for your needs.Toolkit Development and Maintenance CPSI accessed a variety of qualified experts and organizations to compile this practical and evidence-based toolkit. The process included Assigning a CPSI team with support from a writer with experience in the field Seeking advice from an expert faculty that included patient and family representatives Basing the content on the Canadian Incident Analysis Framework Engaging key stakeholders via focus groups and collecting evidence from peer-reviewed journals and publicly available literature The toolkit will be updated every year to keep it relevant. We welcome feedback on what is helpful, what can be improved, and content enhancements at info@cpsi-icsp.ca.Patient Safety and Incident Management ToolkitPrevent Patient Safety Incidents and Minimize Harm When They Do Occur When a patient's safety is compromised, or even if someone just comes close to6/19/2017 4:19:43 PM9071https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Teamwork and Communication36597Publication;Framework7/22/2009 8:44:35 PM ​​​Effective teamwork and communication are critical for ensuring high reliability and the safe delivery of care. Teamwork and communication techniques can improve quality and safety, decrease patient harm, promote cross-professional collaboration and the development of common goals, decrease workload issues, and improve staff and patient satisfaction. Building effective teams and improving communication through standardized tools will move effective teamwork forward in Canada and contribute to a culture of patient safety. CPSI is developing a Canadian Framework for Teamwork and Communication to help healthcare providers and organizations integrate tools and resources into practice. Canadian Framework for Teamwork and Communication Appendix A Teamwork and Communication in Healthcare A Literature Review Appendix B Consultation with Health Professionals and Administrators Regarding Teamwork and Communication Appendix C Report on Summary of Team Training Programs Download Canadian Framework for Teamwork and CommunicationEffective Teamwork and Communication to Enhance Patient Safety11/9/2016 8:44:39 PM5943https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
The Canadian Surgical Site Infection Prevention Audit - Results 36598Events;Presentation;Report8/31/2015 5:35:10 PM Surgical site infection is the most common healthcare associated infection among surgical patients, with 77 per cent of patient deaths reported to be related to infection. In February 2016, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) along with our partners Alberta Health Services-Surgery Strategic Clinical Network, Atlantic Health Quality & Patient Safety Collaborative, BC Patient Safety & Quality Council, Health Quality Ontario, and Saskatchewan Ministry of Health- Patient Safety Unit, conducted the Canadian Surgical Site Infection (SSI) Prevention Audit. Download Auditing helps to identify both areas of excellence and areas for improvement. During the month of February, all acute care organizations providing surgical services were challenged to audit their established processes for preventing surgical site infections (SSI). 52 service areas participated in the Surgical Site Infection Prevention Audit with 1.998 patient charts audited. Audit highlights noted that 91% of patients received appropriate prophylactic antibiotics and 96% of patients received the appropriate method of pre-operative hair removal whereas post-operative glucose control was identified as an area requiring improvement. To learn more about the Canadian Surgical Site Infection Prevention Audit and Results Click here for information regarding Audit Methodology Access the National Call Results from Canadian SSI Prevention Audit; March 24th, 2016 View the Canadian Surgical Site Infection Prevention Audit Recap Report Audit Recap Report The Canadian Surgical Site Infection Prevention Audit - Results Surgical site infection is the most common healthcare associated infection among surgical patients, with 77 per cent of patient deaths reported to be3/6/2017 8:08:44 PM728https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
The Safety Competencies Framework36599Publication;Framework4/14/2009 11:53:32 PM ​​​Achieve safe patient care by incorporating our framework The Safety Competencies into your healthcare organization’s educational programs and professional development activities. Patient safety, defined as the reduction and mitigation of unsafe acts within the healthcare system, and the use of best practices shown to lead to optimal patient outcomes, is a critical aspect of quality healthcare. Download Flyer Educating healthcare providers about patient safety and enabling them to use the tools and knowledge to build and maintain a safe system is critical to creating one of the safest health systems in the world. The Safety Competencies is a highly relevant, clear, and practical framework designed for all healthcare professionals. Created by the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI), The Safety Competencies has six core competency domains Domain 1 Contribute to a Culture of Patient Safety – A commitment to applying core patient safety knowledge, skills, and attitudes to everyday work. Domain 2 Work in Teams for Patient Safety – Working within interprofessional teams to optimize patient safety and quality of care.. Domain 3 Communicate Effectively for Patient Safety – Promoting patient safety through effective healthcare communication.. Domain 4 Manage Safety Risks – Anticipating, recognizing, and managing situations that place patients at risk.. Domain 5 Optimize Human and Environmental Factors – Managing the relationship between individual and environmental characteristics in order to optimize patient safety.. Domain 6 Recognize, Respond to, and Disclose Adverse Events – Recognizing the occurrence of an adverse event or close call and responding effectively to mitigate harm to the patient, ensure disclosure, and prevent recurrence.. This valuable framework includes 20 key competencies, 140 enabling competencies, 37 knowledge elements, 34 practical skills, and 23 essential attitudes that can lead to safer patient care and quality improvement. CPSI encourages its stakeholders, national, provincial, and territorial health organizations, associations, and governments; and universities and colleges to play a role in engaging stakeholders and spreading the word about this program so that healthcare professionals recognize the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to enhance patient safety across the spectrum of care. For further information, please email safetycomp@cpsi-icsp.ca.The Safety CompetenciesThe Safety Competencies: Message from the CEO9/12/2017 8:43:40 PM13335https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Weight-Based Dosing Summary: Physician Support Tool36603Guide8/27/2015 7:39:20 PM ​​​​The Weight-Based Dosing Summary Physician Support Tool is a comprehensive, 4 page resource adapted from the Surgical Site Infections (SSI) Getting Started Kit (2014). It provides a concise table and supporting references regarding evidence based recommended doses, administration and re-dosing intervals for commonly used antimicrobials prescribed for surgical prophylaxis. The Weight-Based Dosing Summary Physician Support Tool can be posted in your work area as an efficient reference guide to support improved antibiotic prophylaxis; reducing the risk of surgical infection. Download Weight-Based Dosing Summary: Physician Support ToolThe Weight-Based Dosing Summary: Physician Support Tool is a comprehensive, 4 page resource adapted from the Surgical Site Infections (SSI)11/9/2016 8:53:22 PM2040https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Report on the Integration of the Safety Competencies Framework36604Framework;Report9/12/2017 7:58:51 PM CPSI is pleased to present a comprehensive new report on the integration and impact of the Safety Competencies Framework (SCF) originally launched in 2008 in partnership with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. The framework has been one of the most downloaded documents on the CPSI website, consistently since its launch. Almost 10 years after the launch, this report examines the historical background of the SCF while providing a rationale for the development of the competencies, mapping of the competencies to integrate patient safety content in training programs. The report outlines the successes and challenges in the uptake of the competencies and includes a provocative call to action for educators. Several key findings were determined through interviews done with a select group of stakeholders familiar with the SCF and this feedback provided better understanding of the value of the competencies to organizations and professional bodies. As we look towards renewing the SCF to address feedback received, it is clear that despite the successes and challenges, we must shift our attention away from the "what" to focus on the "how" of integrating safety competencies in the curricula of health professionals on a more consistent basis. Download Report on the Integration of the Safety Competencies FrameworkCPSI is pleased to present a comprehensive new report on the integration and impact of the Safety Competencies Framework (SCF)9/12/2017 8:32:01 PM1689https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Engaging Patients in Patient Safety – a Canadian Guide36605Guide4/25/2017 3:01:50 PM During the past decade, we have seen evidence that when healthcare providers work closely with patients and their families, we can achieve great things. The healthcare system will be safer, and patients will have better experiences and health outcomes when patients, families, and the public are fully engaged in program and service design and delivery. Patient involvement is also important in monitoring, evaluating, setting policy and priorities, and governance. This work is not easy and may even be uncomfortable at first. Providers may need to let go of control, change behaviours to listen and understand patients more effectively, brainstorm ideas together, build trust, and incorporate many different perspectives. Patients may need to participate more actively in decisions about their care. Leaders must support all this work by revising practices to embed patient engagement in their procedures, policies, and structures. But finding different and innovative ways to work together, even when it's challenging, benefits everyone. When patients and healthcare providers partner effectively, the results are powerful. We invite you to join us in advancing this work. We welcome diverse perspectives and beliefs to challenge the status quo. Let's explore ways to shape new behaviours, using everyone's unique perspectives and courage to make healthcare a safe and positive experience. A deep belief in the power of partnership inspired the Engaging Patients in Patient Safety - a Canadian Guide. Written by patients and providers for patients and providers, the information demonstrates our joint commitment to achieving safe and quality healthcare in Canada. Download Better yet, bookmark this page. This resource is updated regularly. To ensure you are accessing the most up-to-date version, we recommend that you bookmark this page for future reference. Who is this guide for? The guide is for anyone involved with patient engagement, including Patients and families interested in how to partner in their own care to ensure safety Patient partners interested in how to help improve patient safety Providers interested in creating collaborative care relationships with patients and families Managers and leaders responsible for patient engagement, patient safety, and/or quality improvement Anyone else interested in partnering with patients to develop care programs and systems While the guide focuses primarily on patient safety, many engagement practices apply to other areas, including quality, research, and education. The guide is designed to support patient engagement in any healthcare sector. What is the purpose of the guide? This extensive resource, based on evidence and leading practices, helps patients and families, patient partners, providers, and leaders work together more effectively to improve patient safety. Working collaboratively, we can more proactively identify risks, better support those involved in an incident, and help prevent similar incidents from occurring in the future. Together we can shape safe, high-quality care delivery, co-design safer care systems, and continuously improve to keep patients safe.What is included in the guide? Evidence-based guidance Practical patient engagement practices Consolidated information, resources, and tools Supporting evidence and examples from across Canada Experiences from patients and families, providers, and leaders Outstanding questions about how to strengthen current approaches Strategies and policies to meet standards and organizational practice requirementsChapter summariesEngaging patients as partners Why partner on patient safety and quality Current state of patient engagement across Canada Evidence of patient engagement benefits and impact Challenges and enablers to patient engagement Embedding and sustaining patient engagement Read More Partners at the point of care Partnering in patient safety Partnering in incident management Read More Partners at organizational and system levels Preparing to partner Partnering in patient safety Partnering in incident management Read More Evaluating patient engagement Introduction to evaluating patient engagement Evaluating patient engagement at the point of care Evaluating patient engagement at the organizational level Evaluating patient engagement integration Read More Click here to learn how and why was the guide developed. ​ ​ ​ Citation Patient Engagement Action Team. 2017. Engaging Patients in Patient Safety – a Canadian Guide. Canadian Patient Safety Institute. Last modified February 2018. Available at www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/engagingpatients Engaging Patients in Patient Safety – a Canadian GuideDuring the past decade, we have seen evidence that when healthcare providers work closely with patients and their families, we can achieve great8/19/2019 7:55:16 PM11618https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Questions Are the Answer36606Checklists;Patient and Family Resource7/14/2016 9:07:34 PMTips and Tools for Talking to Your Healthcare Team Empower yourself with information and tools to help you ask good questions, connect with the right people, and learn as much as you can to keep you or a family member safe while receiving healthcare. Questions Are the Answer helps you effectively prepare for making decisions about medical treatment options by asking the right questions of your healthcare team. It considers topics for before, during, and after appointments, using past, present, and future medicines, medical tests, and surgeries. Always use these resources before you attend any healthcare appointment Questions to ask before an appointment Questions to ask during an appointment Questions to ask after an appointment Overall question checklist SHIFT to Safety helps you advocate for your healthcare safety. Shift your focus to what really matters—the patient. Are you a provider? Please share this valuable resource with your patients! For more information, contact us at info@cpsi-icsp.ca. Internet Citation Be More Involved in Your Health Care. September 2012. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD.Questions Are the AnswerTips and Tools for Talking to Your Healthcare Team Empower yourself with information and tools to help you ask good questions, connect with the4/5/2017 7:20:44 PM5904https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Deteriorating Patient Condition36607Toolkits3/30/2017 5:19:46 PM Early warning signs of deteriorating condition are often unrecognized, leading to devastating results. Research shows that virtually all critical inpatient events are preceded by warning signs that occur approximately six-and-a-half hours in advance. In this section, you'll find information, tools and resources to not only help you recognize deteriorating patient condition, but what you can do to act on it as a member of the public, a healthcare provider or leader. Click any of the icons below to get started! Deteriorating Patient ConditionEarly warning signs of deteriorating condition are often unrecognized, leading to devastating results. Research shows that virtually all critical4/10/2018 3:45:44 PM1423https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Safety Improvement Projects36609Framework9/14/2018 2:50:29 PM Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) launched 4 Safety Improvement Projects in 2018/2019. Thirty teams from across Canada have been participating in the Safety Improvement Project Learning Collaborative with a lifecycle that extends over 18 months.A brief description of each project is provided below Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) launched 4 Safety Improvement Projects in 2018/2019. Thirty teams from across Canada have been participating in the Safety Improvement Project Learning Collaborative with a lifecycle that extends over 18 months. A brief description of each project is provided below Teamwork and Communication leads to improved patient safety culture and positive patient outcomes. Medication Safety at Care Transitions improves medication safety at discharge for frail, elderly patients with poly-morbidity in your organization. Enhanced Recovery Canada leads to improved outcomes and system efficiencies for colorectal surgery patients. Measurement and Monitoring of Safety creates a culture of safety and reduces harm in your organization. The learning design for these projects is unique in that it is guided by a Knowledge Translation/Quality Improvement integrated approach. A review of literature demonstrated the use of both Knowledge Translation (KT) and Quality Improvement (QI) being applied to diverse patient clinical situations for improvement of patient outcomes, but although both are supported by their own evidence Koczwara and colleagues describe the connection between these fields as "Although the goals of the two fields seem complementary, they interact only sporadically and superficially, often at odds, and remain isolated from each other not only through their distinct methodology, but also through their effect on and engagement with the healthcare system." (Koczwara et al, 2018). As such, CPSI has consulted with the Center for Implementation and to identifying synergies between knowledge translation and quality improvement that will leverage the strengths of each field for greater impact in patient safety. Please sign up to subscribe to our Safety Improvement Project mailing list for updates and to learn more about each of these projects. Sign up If you have any questions, please email SafetyImprovementProjects@cpsi-icsp.ca Safety Improvement Projects Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) launched 4 Safety Improvement Projects in 2018/2019. Thirty teams from across Canada have been participating12/13/2019 7:46:58 PM3601https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Sepsis: Prevention, Early Identification and Response: Getting Started Kit Components36610Getting Started Kit;Guide2/24/2016 8:43:33 PM Effective March 14 2019, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute has archived the Sepsis intervention. Though you may continue to access the Getting Started Kit online, it will no longer be updated. Sepsis is a potentially fatal condition involving the body's response to a severe infection. It manifests in various ways and may involve fever, low blood pressure, and dysfunction in vital organs such as the brain, heart, kidneys, and lungs.Sepsis affects 30,000 Canadians each year, and over one-third of these will die if not treated appropriately. As with polytrauma, heart attack, and stroke, the speed and appropriateness of therapy improves patient outcomes.The Sepsis Getting Started Kit provides you with evidence-based resources to assist you in decreasing sepsis rates in your organization as well as in improving clinical outcomes from septic patients. This free resource contains clinical information, information on the science of improvement, and everything you need to know to start using the intervention.Drawn from the best available evidence and expert advice, and regularly updated, the Sepsis Getting Started Kit will help to decrease the morbidity and mortality from sepsis in hospitalized patients through a structured approach to prevention, early identification and response to sepsis.Getting Started Kit The Sepsis Getting Started Kit is divided into five sections Section 1 Prevention, Identification and Response to Sepsis Section 2 Pediatric Sepsis Section 3 Maternal Sepsis Section 4 Measurement – Technical Descriptions and Data Screens Section 5 Sample Checklists and Other Tools Want to learn more? Download the complete Sepsis Getting Started Kit Download This document was updated in September 2015 The Model for Improvement is designed to accelerate the pace of improvement using the PDSA cycle; a "trial and learn" approach to improvement based on the scientific method. Please refer to the Improvement Frameworks GSK (2015) for additional information. For more information, email info@saferhealthcarenow.ca or call 1-866-421-6933Sepsis: Prevention, Early Identification and Response: Getting Started Kit Components Effective March 14 2019, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute has archived the Sepsis intervention. Though you may continue to access the Getting3/25/2019 8:54:38 PM3998https://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx