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​​In recent years, many healthcare organizations have developed local methods for responding to patient safety incidents  with processes that are more rigorous than a simple incident report but less rigorous than a Root Cause Analysis (RCA) or similar comprehensive review. The World Health Organization (WHO) Patient Safety Programme is developing a tool and methodology for the conduct of concise incident analyses, termed the Concise Incident Analysis (CIA) Tool. The concise method included in the Canadian Incident Analysis Framework is one of the main resources on which the CIA Tool is based on. 

The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI), in partnership with the Johns Hopkins’ Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality and the WHO Patient Safety Programme, pilot tested this tool with healthcare organizations around the world.

Click to access version 1 and version 2 of the tool.

Click here to download the final version of the concise analysis tool and workbook (in English only).

Click on the citation below to read a journal article featuring this research.

Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2016;42(1):26-36.
A Tool for the Concise Analysis of Patient Safety Incidents.
Pham JC, Hoffman C, Popescu I, Ijagbemi OM, Carson KA.

To learn more about concise analysis and other incident analysis methods access the Canadian Incident Analysis Framework and/or the Patient Safety and Incident Management Toolkit.

Team

Lead(s)

  • Dr. Julius Pham, Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality
  • Carolyn Hoffman Alberta Health Services

Research coordinator

  • Mayowa Ijagbemi, Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality

International Advisory Team

  • Ross Baker (Canada),
  • Gerry Castro (US),
  • Noel Elridge (US),
  • Donna Forsyth (UK),
  • Ed Kelley (WHO)
  • Sandi Kossey (CPSI)
  • SF Lui (Hong-Kong),
  • Ioana Popescu (CPSI)
  • Jean-Marie Rodrigues (France) 
  • Bill Runciman (Australia),

This project was made possible through the cash and in-kind contributions of the:

  • Canadian Patient Safety Institute
  • Johns Hopkins’ Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality
  • Alberta Health Services
  • World Health Organization Patient Safety Programme