Sign In

 Filter Results

​​​

 

 

The Canadian Human Factors in Healthcare Network32896Research;Guide9/12/2017 2:58:38 PM The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI), through the SHIFT to Safety program, has teamed up with the Canadian Human Factors in Healthcare Network to provide human factors information to healthcare organizations and the professionals who work there to add to their existing knowledge base related to quality and patient safety. Many healthcare professionals in Canada have, by now, heard about human factors engineering and psychology from other patient safety activities or venues, including the WHO human factors module and CPSI modules and presentations on human factors. The network's intent is to provide up to date information about human factors research and trends in Canada and around the world that go beyond the basics. As technology evolves and changes the way we do work, human factors specialists and researchers can help determine ways to improve the safety of the new ways of working. Use the links on the right hand side of the page to learn more about the Canadian Human Factors in Healthcare Network, its members and upcoming learning opportunities. SHIFT to Safety brings you the latest in advancements in human factors in healthcare. Shift your focus to what you do best — improving your practices for the benefit of your patients. The Canadian Human Factors in Healthcare Network is currently supported by the CPSI and in-kind funding by the member organizations. Objective of the NetworkProvide human factors expertise to healthcare organizations through consultation, knowledge transfer and exchange activities.Promote partnerships between healthcare organizations, industry, and academic institutions to promote the delivery of safer, more effective care to patients. If you have any questions for the members of the Healthcare Human Factors Network, please email HF-Network@cpsi-icsp.ca The Canadian Human Factors in Healthcare Network The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI), through the SHIFT to Safety program, has teamed up with the Canadian Human Factors in Healthcare9/12/2017 7:24:00 PM568http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Canadian Disclosure Guidelines2385Guide;Publication4/18/2011 4:05:57 PM ​​​​​​​​​​​​The Canadian Disclosure Guidelines build on various patient safety initiatives currently under way across Canada and assist and support healthcare providers, inter-professional teams, organizations, and regulators. These guidelines symbolize a commitment to patients’ right to be informed if they are involved in a patient safety incident by promoting a clear and consistent approach to disclosure, emphasizing the importance of inter-professional teamwork, and supporting learning from patient safety incidents. The development of the Canadian Disclosure Guidelines is a significant achievement in healthcare in Canada.​ Download Canadian Disclosure Guidelines (November 2011) Backgrounder Development of the Canadian Disclosure Guidelines (2006) The Impact of Disclosure on Litigation (2007)​Canadian Disclosure Guidelines: Being open with patients and familiesThe Canadian Disclosure Guidelines build on various patient safety initiatives currently under way across Canada and assist and support healthcare6/20/2016 8:35:25 PM14870http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Canadian Patient Safety Week (CPSW)2447Events12/8/2009 9:50:43 PM​ Welcome to asklistentalk.ca – your home for Canadian Patient Safety Week!Mark your calendars and register today! Canadian Patient Safety Week 2017 will be held October 30th – November 3rd, 2017 and registration is now open! Due to popular demand, we no longer have any CPSW packages available for order. You can still show your support by registering without a package. Register Now Check back at www.asklistentalk.ca as more updates come out during Canadian Patient Safety Week 2017. Test your Medication Safety Knowledge with our NEW Take With Questions Quiz! Canadian Patient Safety Week is putting you to the test with the Take With Questions medication safety quiz. Try it today and share with your friends and colleagues. Test your knowledge as a healthcare provider or as a member of the public – or both! Find out what kind of patient or provider you really are. Take the Quiz! Share the Quiz! Learn More Introducing the new PATIENT Podcast Series CPSI is excited to launch the new PATIENT podcast series, a nonfiction medical drama about the people trying to fix modern healthcare from the inside out. Be sure you take a listen! Learn More Join us as we focus on medication safety and the 5 Questions to Ask About Your Medications. Learn more about the CPSW 2017 Take with Questions campaign. Learn More Check back at as more details are unveiled.Sponsors CPSI would like to thank our sponsors GOJO Industries and HealthPRO Procurement Services for their contributions to this year’s CPSW packages. About Canadian Patient Safety Week is a national, annual campaign that started in 2005 to inspire extraordinary improvement in patient safety and quality. As the momentum for promoting best practices in patient safety has grown, so has the participation in Canadian Patient Safety Week. Canadian Patient Safety week is relevant to anyone who engages with our healthcare system providers, patients, and citizens. Working together, thousands help spread the message to Ask. Listen. Talk. If your organization is interested in sponsoring a portion of CPSW 2017, please contact sponsorshipsmail@cpsi-icsp.ca. We have many sponsorship opportunities available. Do you have any questions or suggestions? Contact CPSI CommunicationsPhone (780) 409-8090Toll free 1-866-421-6933 Email CPSW@cpsi-icsp.caJoin the conversation at #asklistentalkCanadian Patient Safety WeekCanadian Patient Safety Week (CPSW)10/10/2017 9:28:35 PM88225http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/EventshtmlTrueaspx
Engaging Patients in Patient Safety – a Canadian Guide2367Guide4/25/2017 3:01:50 PM During the past decade, we have seen evidence that when healthcare providers work closely with patients and their families, we can achieve great things. The healthcare system will be safer, and patients will have better experiences and health outcomes when patients, families, and the public are fully engaged in program and service design and delivery. Patient involvement is also important in monitoring, evaluating, setting policy and priorities, and governance. This work is not easy and may even be uncomfortable at first. Providers may need to let go of control, change behaviours to listen and understand patients more effectively, brainstorm ideas together, build trust, and incorporate many different perspectives. Patients may need to participate more actively in decisions about their care. Leaders must support all this work by revising practices to embed patient engagement in their procedures, policies, and structures. But finding different and innovative ways to work together, even when it's challenging, benefits everyone. When patients and healthcare providers partner effectively, the results are powerful. We invite you to join us in advancing this work. We welcome diverse perspectives and beliefs to challenge the status quo. Let's explore ways to shape new behaviours, using everyone's unique perspectives and courage to make healthcare a safe and positive experience. A deep belief in the power of partnership inspired the Engaging Patients in Patient Safety - a Canadian Guide. Written by patients and providers for patients and providers, the information demonstrates our joint commitment to achieving safe and quality healthcare in Canada. Download Who is this guide for? The guide is for anyone involved with patient engagement, includingPatients and families interested in how to partner in their own care to ensure safetyPatient partners interested in how to help improve patient safetyProviders interested in creating collaborative care relationships with patients and familiesManagers and leaders responsible for patient engagement, patient safety, and/or quality improvementAnyone else interested in partnering with patients to develop care programs and systems While the guide focuses primarily on patient safety, many engagement practices apply to other areas, including quality, research, and education. The guide is designed to support patient engagement in any healthcare sector. What is the purpose of the guide? This extensive resource, based on evidence and leading practices, helps patients and families, patient partners, providers, and leaders work together more effectively to improve patient safety. Working collaboratively, we can more proactively identify risks, better support those involved in an incident, and help prevent similar incidents from occurring in the future. Together we can shape safe, high-quality care delivery, co-design safer care systems, and continuously improve to keep patients safe.What is included in the guide?Evidence-based guidancePractical patient engagement practicesConsolidated information, resources, and toolsSupporting evidence and examples from across CanadaExperiences from patients and families, providers, and leadersOutstanding questions about how to strengthen current approachesStrategies and policies to meet standards and organizational practice requirementsChapter summariesEngaging patients as partnersWhy partner on patient safety and qualityCurrent state of patient engagement across CanadaEvidence of patient engagement benefits and impactChallenges and enablers to patient engagementEmbedding and sustaining patient engagement Read More Partners at the point of carePartnering in patient safety Partnering in incident management Read More Partners at organizational and system levelsPreparing to partnerPartnering in patient safety Partnering in incident management Read More Evaluating patient engagementIntroduction to evaluating patient engagementEvaluating patient engagement at the point of careEvaluating patient engagement at the organizational levelEvaluating patient engagement integration Read More Click here to learn how and why was the guide developed. ​ ​​ Engaging Patients in Patient Safety – a Canadian GuideDuring the past decade, we have seen evidence that when healthcare providers work closely with patients and their families, we can achieve great6/19/2017 5:27:43 PM11061http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Patient Stories23897/27/2015 12:39:48 PM ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Patient Stories5/19/2016 4:22:33 AM17851http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
The Safety Competencies Framework2362Publication;Framework4/14/2009 11:53:32 PM ​​​Achieve safe patient care by incorporating our framework The Safety Competencies into your healthcare organization’s educational programs and professional development activities. Patient safety, defined as the reduction and mitigation of unsafe acts within the healthcare system, and the use of best practices shown to lead to optimal patient outcomes, is a critical aspect of quality healthcare. Download Flyer Educating healthcare providers about patient safety and enabling them to use the tools and knowledge to build and maintain a safe system is critical to creating one of the safest health systems in the world. The Safety Competencies is a highly relevant, clear, and practical framework designed for all healthcare professionals. Created by the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI), The Safety Competencies has six core competency domains Domain 1 Contribute to a Culture of Patient Safety – A commitment to applying core patient safety knowledge, skills, and attitudes to everyday work. Domain 2 Work in Teams for Patient Safety – Working within interprofessional teams to optimize patient safety and quality of care.. Domain 3 Communicate Effectively for Patient Safety – Promoting patient safety through effective healthcare communication.. Domain 4 Manage Safety Risks – Anticipating, recognizing, and managing situations that place patients at risk.. Domain 5 Optimize Human and Environmental Factors – Managing the relationship between individual and environmental characteristics in order to optimize patient safety.. Domain 6 Recognize, Respond to, and Disclose Adverse Events – Recognizing the occurrence of an adverse event or close call and responding effectively to mitigate harm to the patient, ensure disclosure, and prevent recurrence.. This valuable framework includes 20 key competencies, 140 enabling competencies, 37 knowledge elements, 34 practical skills, and 23 essential attitudes that can lead to safer patient care and quality improvement. CPSI encourages its stakeholders, national, provincial, and territorial health organizations, associations, and governments; and universities and colleges to play a role in engaging stakeholders and spreading the word about this program so that healthcare professionals recognize the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to enhance patient safety across the spectrum of care. For further information, please email safetycomp@cpsi-icsp.ca.The Safety CompetenciesThe Safety Competencies: Message from the CEO9/12/2017 8:43:40 PM40063http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Patient Safety and Incident Management Toolkit2359Toolkits12/18/2014 8:28:40 PMPrevent Patient Safety Incidents and Minimize Harm When They Do Occur When a patient's safety is compromised, or even if someone just comes close to having an incident, you need to know you are taking the right measures to address it, now and in the future. CPSI provides you with practical strategies and resources to manage incidents effectively and keep your patients safe. This integrated toolkit considers the needs and concerns of patients and their families, and how to properly engage them throughout the process. Drawn from the best available evidence and expert advice, this newly designed toolkit is for those responsible for managing patient safety, quality improvement, risk management, and staff training in any healthcare setting. Patient Safety Management Incident Management System Factors For more information, contact us at info@cpsi-icsp.ca.Toolkit Focus and Components The toolkit focuses on patient safety and incident management; it touches on ideas and resources for exploring the broader aspects of quality improvement and risk management. There are three sections to the toolkit Incident management—the actions that follow patient safety incidents (including near misses)Patient safety management—the actions that help to proactively anticipate patient safety incidents and prevent them from occurring System factors—the factors that shape and are shaped by patient safety and incident management (legislation, policies, culture, people, processes and resources). Visual representation of the toolkit. Incident management Resources to guide the immediate and ongoing actions following a patient safety incident (including near misses). We emphasize immediate response, disclosure, how to prepare for analysis, the analysis process, follow-through, how to close the loop and share learning. Patient safety management Resources to guide action before the incident (e.g., plan, anticipate, and monitor to respond to expected and unexpected safety issues) so care is safer today and in the future. We promote a patient safety culture and reporting and learning system. System factors Understanding the factors that shape both patient safety and incident management and identify actions to respond, align, and leverage them is crucial to patient safety. The factors come from different system levels (inside and outside the organization) and include legislation, policies, culture, people, processes and resources.Implementing Patient Safety and Incident Management Processes Consider the following guiding principles when applying the practical strategies and resources. Patient- and family-centred care. The patient and family are at the centre of all patient safety and incident management activities. Engage with patients and families throughout their care processes, as they are an equal partner and essential to the design, implementation, and evaluation of care and services. Safety culture. Culture refers to shared values (what is important) and beliefs (what is held to be true) that interact with a system's structures and control mechanisms to produce behavioural norms. An organization with a safety culture avoids, prevents, and mitigates patient safety risks at all levels. This includes a reporting and learning culture. System perspective. Keep patients safe by understanding and addressing the factors that contribute to an incident at all system levels, redesigning systems, and applying human factor principles. Develop the capability and capacity for effectively assessing the complex system to accurately identify weaknesses and strengths for preventing future incidents. Shared responsibilities. Teamwork is necessary for safe patient care, particularly at transitions in care. It is the best defence against system failures and should be actively fostered by all team members, including patients and families. In a functional teamwork environment, everyone is valued, empowered, and responsible for taking action to prevent patient safety incidents, including speaking up when they see practices that endanger safety.Resources to Support Patient Safety and Incident Management CPSI's toolkit resources are practical tools for patient safety and incident management, compiled with input from experts and contributing organizations. You may not require all of them when managing an incident, so please use your discretion in selecting the tools most appropriate for your needs.Toolkit Development and Maintenance CPSI accessed a variety of qualified experts and organizations to compile this practical and evidence-based toolkit. The process includedAssigning a CPSI team with support from a writer with experience in the fieldSeeking advice from an expert faculty that included patient and family representativesBasing the content on the Canadian Incident Analysis FrameworkEngaging key stakeholders via focus groups and collecting evidence from peer-reviewed journals and publicly available literature The toolkit will be updated every year to keep it relevant. We welcome feedback on what is helpful, what can be improved, and content enhancements at info@cpsi-icsp.ca.Patient Safety and Incident Management ToolkitPrevent Patient Safety Incidents and Minimize Harm When They Do Occur When a patient's safety is compromised, or even if someone just comes close to6/19/2017 4:19:43 PM22062http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
The Measurement and Monitoring of Safety2377Metrics;Report;Framework7/12/2016 5:25:21 PM Rewiring your thinking on measuring and monitoring of patient safety. To improve your organization's patient safety, you need reliable, up-to-date qualitative and quantitative information to help guide your delivery of safe healthcare. The Measurement and Monitoring Safety Framework, created by Professor Charles Vincent and colleagues from the Health Foundation, consists of five dimensions that organizations, units, or individuals including leaders, providers, patients and families can use to understand, guide and improve patient safety. This new approach assesses and evaluates safety from "ward to board" by providing a comprehensive and accurate real-time view of patient safety. The Framework helps users move from “assurance” to “inquiry” by shifting away from a focus on past cases of harm towards current performance, future risks and organizational resiliency. Download Armed with a series of valuable questions, you can make better decisions about the safety of the care you provide. The primary questions are Has patient care been safe in the past?Are our clinical systems and processes reliable?Is our care safe now? Will our care be safe in the future? Are we responding and improving? The Framework will be foundational to CPSI's new measurement coaching services offered by its Central Measurement Team. Stay tuned for additional details on how to access these coaching services. For more information, contact us at info@cpsi-icsp.ca. "The Framework helps us think differently, and have different conversations at different levels, whether it be at ward level through safety huddles and safety briefs in the morning, the hospital safety brief, or through other scheduled meetings. By doing this we can ensure everything we do every day for our patients and for our staff is focused on the same thing. We consider different components to determine if it's affected by system, process, or human factor and determine what we should do differently." -- Charlie Sinclair, Associate Director, Nursing NHS BordersThe Measurement and Monitoring of SafetyRewiring your thinking on measuring and monitoring of patient safety. To improve your organization's patient safety, you need reliable, up-to-date10/12/2017 4:50:56 PM3229http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Healthcare Provider Stories239310/19/2015 4:42:11 PM​​Healthcare Provider Stories10/26/2015 3:41:32 PM2987http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Deteriorating Patient Condition2369Toolkits3/30/2017 5:19:46 PM Early warning signs of deteriorating condition are often unrecognized, leading to devastating results. Research shows that virtually all critical inpatient events are preceded by warning signs that occur approximately six-and-a-half hours in advance. In this section, you'll find information, tools and resources to not only help you recognize deteriorating patient condition, but what you can do to act on it as a member of the public, a healthcare provider or leader. Click any of the icons below to get started! Deteriorating Patient ConditionEarly warning signs of deteriorating condition are often unrecognized, leading to devastating results. Research shows that virtually all critical7/25/2017 3:20:49 PM1067http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Enhanced Recovery After Surgery2397Video7/13/2016 2:57:58 AM What is Enhanced Recovery After Surgery? Enhanced Recovery After Surgery - ERAS is a program highlighting surgical best practices and consists of a number of evidence-based principles that support better outcomes for surgical patients including an improved patient experience, reduced length of stay, decreased complication rates and fewer hospital readmissions. As part of CPSI's Integrated Patient Safety Action Plan for Surgical Care Safety and with support from 24 partner organizations from across the country, Enhanced Recovery Canada is leading the drive to improve surgical safety across the country and help disseminate these ERAS principles. A number of Canadian surgical care teams have already embraced the ERAS principles Alberta Health Services, Eastern Health, McGill University Health Centre, University of Toronto's Best Practices in Surgery, the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority as well as BC's Patient Safety & Quality Council and the Doctors of British Columbia. Additional Information Video Series We trust this 6 part interview with international ERAS expert Dr. Henrik Kehlet will whet your appetite. Stay tuned for additional information regarding Enhanced Recovery Canada. Use the YouTube playlist below to play all, or any of the six videos in the series. Where can you learn more about ERAS in the interim?BC's ERAS Collaborative has developed a website providing a variety of resources to support the implementation of Enhanced Surgical Recovery programs. See Enhanced Recovery BCThe McGill University Health Center has developed a number of ERAS related Surgery Patient Guides you may find helpful as well. For more information, contact us at info@cpsi-icsp.ca.Enhanced Recovery After SurgeryWhat is Enhanced Recovery After Surgery ? Enhanced Recovery After Surgery - ERAS is a program highlighting surgical best practices and consists of a7/31/2017 10:04:06 PM1126http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Five Questions to Ask about your Medications2378Patient and Family Resource;Checklists;Toolkits2/25/2016 8:39:10 PM Ask the Right Questions about Your Medications For patients who require multiple medications or who are transitioning between treatments, safety can become a concern. You or your loved one may be at risk of fragmented care, adverse drug reactions, and medication errors. To be an active partner in your health, you need the right information to use your medications safely. Download CPSI has teamed up with the Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada, Patients for Patient Safety Canada, the Canadian Pharmacists Association, and the Canadian Society for Hospital Pharmacists to create a list of top questions to help patients and their caregivers have a conversation about medications with their healthcare provider. Use these five questions when you're Attending a doctor's appointment (e.g., family physician or specialist, dentist, optometrist)Interacting with a community pharmacistLeaving the hospital to go homeVisited by home care services Are you a provider? Please share this valuable resource with your patients! Visit ISMP Canada for additional resources and endorsementsClick here for Additional resourcesClick here to endorse and add your organizations logo For more information, contact medrec@ismp-canada.org.Five Questions to Ask about your Medications Ask the Right Questions about Your Medications For patients who require multiple medications or who are transitioning between treatments, safety can4/5/2017 7:26:26 PM12851http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
STOP! Clean Your Hands Day2448Events6/3/2015 4:46:05 PM​​​​​​May 5, 2017 Join the conversation #STOPCleanyourhandsday It's time for patients and providers to come together for clean hands – STOP​​! Clean Your Hands​ Day returns Friday, May 5, 2017. The theme for STOP! Clean Your Hands Day is Ask Yourself… Making a change to your behaviour can be as simple as asking yourself a question and understanding that change doesn’t need to be a burden. Small, incremental changes can lead to big things. Not only can you improve your own practices, you’re setting a great, easy to follow example for everyone around you! Whether you’re a patient, provider, or work in a healthcare setting – if you’re involved in the healthcare system, take the time to have a conversation with yourself and ask what you can change today to improve for tomorrow. Here's a run down of what we've got planned for STOP! Clean Your Hands Day 2017Webinar We're hosting a webinar May 4, 2017 at 10 am MT / 12 pm ET. Learn More How Clean Are Your Hands? Take the Quiz Video Competition Thank you to everyone who submitted a video, they look great! View Videos Winners will be announced May 4, 2017 during our STOP! Clean Your Hands Day webinar. Sponsored by ​Partners STOP! Clean Your Hands Day May 5, 2017 Join the conversation #STOPCleanyourhandsday It's time for patients and providers to come together for clean hands –4/21/2017 9:31:19 PM28706http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/EventshtmlTrueaspx
Medication Reconciliation (Med Rec): Getting Started Kit4384Getting Started Kit;Toolkits7/1/2015 8:53:35 AM ​​ Getting Started Kit This free resource is designed to help you successfully implement interventions in your organization. The Getting Started Kit contains clinical information, information on the science of improvement, and everything you need to know to start using the intervention. Click here to download the Acute Care Getting Started Kit.Click here to download the Long Term Care Getting Started Kit.Click here to download the Home Care Getting Started Kit. One-Pager The One-Pager is a summary of the Getting Started Kit that you can use to promote the intervention to your organization. Click here to download the Acute Care One-Pager.Click here to download the Long Term Care One-Pager.Click here to download the Home Care One-Pager. Icons Intervention Icons Use these intervention icons on presentations, reports, flyers, and other material to promote the intervention throughout your organization. Click here to download the full-colour intervention icon.Click here to download the black and white intervention icon. Intervention Icons With TextClick here to download the full-colour Acute Care intervention icon with text.Click here to download the black and white Acute Care intervention icon with text. Click here to download the full-colour Long Term Care intervention icon with text.Click here to download the black and white Long Term Care intervention icon with text. Click here to download the full-colour Home Care intervention icon with text.Click here to download the black and white Home Care intervention icon with text Medication Reconciliation (Med Rec): Getting Started Kit11/28/2016 4:44:08 PM9024http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Pages/Forms/NewDefaultView.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Surgical Safety in Canada: A 10-year review of CMPA and HIROC medico-legal data2383Report4/8/2016 8:36:50 PM More than one million surgical procedures were performed annually in Canada between 2004 and 2013. The Canadian healthcare system strives to provide safe care, but patient safety incidents still occur, with over half attributed to surgical care. Safe surgical care requires that physicians and healthcare teams use appropriate tools and contribute to system improvements within a complex professional environment. The Canadian Medical Protective Association (CMPA), which provides medical liability protection for most Canadian physicians, and the Healthcare Insurance Reciprocal of Canada (HIROC), which provides liability insurance for healthcare organizations and their employees, have collaborated to conduct a retrospective analysis of Canadian surgical safety incident data. This analysis of medico-legal data advances knowledge in patient safety concepts, and is intended to lead to system and practice improvements. This analysis was undertaken as part of the Surgical Care Safety Action Plan. A summary of the results and recommendations can be found in the summary report Surgical Safety in Canada A 10-year review of CMPA and HIROC medico-legal data. A deep dive into the methods, limitations and the results can be found in the Detailed Analysis report. Summary Detailed Analysis Surgical Safety in Canada: A 10-year review of CMPA and HIROC medico-legal data More than one million surgical procedures were performed annually in Canada between 2004 and 2013. The Canadian healthcare system strives to provide4/11/2016 5:18:04 PM3879http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Patient Concern Resolution Process2382Guide;Patient and Family Resource;Toolkits4/19/2011 6:12:38 PM​​​Every patient experience should be safe. Patients, residents, clients, and their families can be active partners in safe care. Help ensure a safe patient experience with information, tools, tips, and resources for patients and their families. Patient Concern Resolution Process If you have a question or a concern about the healthcare services you have received, there are several options that may be available. You may be able to resolve the problem simply by talking to your healthcare provider—a physician, a nurse, someone else directly involved in your care, or the appropriate supervisor. Your healthcare provider is in the best position to address your questions and concerns. If your questions or concerns are still not fully addressed, you can Talk to the healthcare organization or regional health authority that provided the care. Some have a patient relations officer, client representative, or patient advocate to assist you with the process. If you have specific concerns about the conduct of a healthcare provider, comments should be directed to the appropriate professional regulatory body, such as the College of Physicians and Surgeons, the Registered Nurses Association, or other health professions’ regulatory authorities. Regulatory bodies generally have their own concern-handling bylaws, policies, or procedures, and they can assist you. You may be asked to put your concern in writing and identify yourself so that the issue can be thoroughly investigated. If none of the above options results in the resolution of your question or concern, you may wish to contact the ministry of health in the province where you received your care. If your concerns are still not addressed, you may be able to appeal through various mechanisms including the provincial/territorial ombudsman or a similar advocacy body. For more information Alberta British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick Newfoundland and Labrador Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan The Northwest Territories Yukon Please note If you received healthcare services in the Province of Quebec and have a question or concern about those services, please refer to the following website for information regarding resolution of your concern msss.gouv.qc.ca/reseau/plaintes.php As it is recognized that the patient's family or another advocate may be included in the concern resolution process, the term "patient" includes family members or advocates.Patient Concern Resolution ProcessEvery patient experience should be safe. Patients, residents, clients, and their families can be active partners in safe care. Help ensure a safe6/13/2017 7:42:45 PM3615http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Canada's Virtual Forum2445Events7/12/2011 8:55:44 PM​​​​​​​​ Thank you to the more than 1,100 viewers from the nearly 600 sites in Canada and 6 countries around the world that made Canada's Virtual Forum on Patient Safety & Quality Improvement a huge success! If you weren't able to watch live, or if you want to watch anything again, click here to access the archives and watch recordings of each of our sessions. Make use of these recordings during your in-services and as part of your local education sessions. 2015 Archive​s We would like to hear from you To help us plan for future events, we'd like to have your feedback. Please tell us what went well or what we could do better by completing our survey. Questions or comments? Contact CPSI Communications at info@cpsi-icsp.ca.Canada’s Virtual Forum on Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Thank you to the more than 1,100 viewers from the nearly 600 sites in Canada and 6 countries around the world that made Canada's Virtual5/25/2016 4:28:18 PM26394http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/EventshtmlTrueaspx
#SHIFTTalks Hear me out32891News9/8/2017 4:10:54 PM9/8/2017 6:00:00 AM The value of effective communication during patient handovers Just hours after being discharged from the emergency department, a five-week old infant sustained permanent brain damage due to a delayed diagnosis and treatment for meningitis. The cause – miscommunication and the absence of a reliable process to ensure pending tests following a patient discharge. Cases like these beg the question, are poor communication practices during shift changes and transfers between care providers so ubiquitous in healthcare that we have become numb to their chilling effects on patient safety? Sadly, we might think we’re communicating well but in the chaotic and stressful healthcare environment, the messages can easily start to look like a game of broken telephone. Communication handovers – be they between healthcare providers, facilities or sectors – can be complex. One article suggested that the average healthcare provider encounters 11 to 15 interruptions hourly. Other research tells us that only 42% of nurses can identify their patient’s primary care provider and 23% of physicians can identify their patient’s primary nurse. According to CRICO, healthcare miscommunication cost $1.7B and impacted nearly 2,000 lives in a study of claims filed between 2009 and 2013. A similar grim situation exists in Canada. The Canadian Adverse Events Study found miscommunication during care transitions were a key factor in medication adverse events. Based on claims data from HIROC (the Healthcare Insurance Reciprocal of Canada), communication failures contributed to an estimated $305 million in medical legal costs since 1987. Contrary to these findings, The 2015 Accreditation Canada Report on Required Organizational Practices (ROP) revealed an overall compliance score of 99% for the practice of ensuring effective information at transition points. However, this finding specified that tests for compliance did not assess the quality of information transferred. There are some promising signs that things are changing. We are seeing studies on standardized practices to bridge the gap between varying communication styles. There is also a focus on team-based safety practices such as routine huddles and debriefs to enhance communication. And finally, tools and resources like CPSI’s SHIFT to Safety platform help empower patients and families to start conversations during care transitions. For leadership, it comes down to prioritizing effective communication, making use of technology and building of a culture of safety. We must do it for our staff, our organizations and for our patients who leave their fate in our hands. ​ ​By Joanna Noble, Supervisor, Knowledge Transfer Healthcare Risk Management, HIROC The value of effective communication during patient handovers Just hours after being discharged from the emergency department, a five-week old9/11/2017 4:40:02 PM827http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/NewsAlerts/News/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Introduction of the Measuring and Monitoring of Safety (Vincent) Framework to Canada4381Events;Presentation;Metrics1/4/2017 4:11:25 PM ArchiveMonday, January 30, 2017 at 1000 am MST / 1200 pm EST Purpose of the Call "…if I apply this [framework] conceptually to any problem I've got in safety I can make it work, and it orders my thinking" – Neil Prentice, Assistant Medical Director Mental Health, Tayside Trust, Scotland In Canada, as in the UK and US the focus of governments on assessing both quality and safety has increased over the past 10 years.[1],[2] A very large number of quality outcomes have been specified but the approach to safety has been much narrower, leaving many aspects of safety unexplored.[3] The measurement of harm, so important in the evolution of patient safety, has been largely neglected[4] and there have been prominent calls for improved measures.[5] There is a critical need for patient safety measurement at the front lines, so that clinical teams can focus on key problems. Don Berwick has stated that 'most health care organisations at present have very little capacity to analyse, monitor, or learn from safety and quality information. This gap is costly and should be closed. Early warning signals can be valued and should be maintained and heeded'.5,[7] In 2013 Professors Charles Vincent, Susan Burnett and Jane Carthey published their report The Measuring and Monitoring of Safety[8] which describes their framework to be implemented in practice to close the gap identified by Berwick. The framework provides a broader view of the information needed to create and sustain safer care. ObjectivesIntroduce the Measuring and Monitoring of Safety Framework to a Canadian healthcare audienceDescribe how the framework would work in Canada Resources Video Presentation A framework for measuring and monitoring safety A practical guide to using a new framework for measuring and monitoring safety in the NHS (2014) - Download the guide from The Health FoundationThe measurement and monitoring of safety Drawing together academic evidence and practical experience to produce a framework for safety measurement and monitoring (2013) – Download the full report from The Health Foundation Speaker Biographies Professor Charles Vincent Professor Charles Vincent is trained as a clinical psychologist and has worked in the British NHS for several years. Since 1985 he has focused on conducting research on the causes of harm to patients, the consequences for patients and staff and methods of improving the safety of healthcare. He established the Clinical Risk Unit at the Department of Psychology, University College London where he was Professor of Psychology. In 2002 he moved to become Professor of Clinical Safety Research in the Department of Surgery and Cancer at Imperial College in 2002. From 1999 to 2003 he was a Commissioner on the UK Commission for Health Improvement. He has acted as an advisor on patient safety in many inquiries and committees including the Bristol Inquiry, the Parliamentary Health Select Committee, the Francis Inquiry and the Berwick Review. From 2007 to 2013 he was the Director of the National Institute of Health Research Centre for Patient Safety & Service Quality at Imperial College. He moved to the Department of Experimental Psychology in January 2014 with the support of the Health Foundation to continue his work on safety in healthcare. G. Ross Baker, Ph.D. G. Ross Baker, Ph.D., is a professor in the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto and Director of the MSc. Program in Quality Improvement and Patient Safety. Ross is co-lead for a large quality improvement-training program in Ontario, IDEAS (improving and Driving Excellence Across Sectors). Recent research projects include a review and synthesis of evidence on factors linked to high performing healthcare systems, an analysis of why progress on patient safety has been slower than expected and an edited book of case studies on patient engagement strategies. Chris Power What began as a desire to help those in need 30 years ago has evolved into a mission to improve the quality of healthcare for all Canadians. Chris Power's journey in healthcare began at the bedside as a front-line nurse. Since then, she has grown into one of the preeminent healthcare executives in Canada. Her experiences, her success, and her values have led her to the position of CEO of the Canadian Patient Safety Institute. Previously, Chris served for eight years as president and CEO of Capital Health, Nova Scotia, with an annual operating budget of approximately $900 million, and 12,000 staff. Under Chris’s leadership Capital Health achieved Accreditation with Exemplary Status in 2014 with recognition for 10 Leading Practices.​ SHIFT to Safety Ensuring patients are safe remains a major challenge for Canadian healthcare organisations and systems. The Canadian Patient Safety Institute's (CPSI) new initiative, SHIFT to Safety, has been launched to address these challenges, including helping providers and leaders improve their measurement efforts. References [1] Baker, G Ross, Beyond the quick fix – Strategies for improving patient safety. Institute of Health Policy Management and Evaluation. Nov.9.2015 [2] Darzi A. High quality care for all. London Department of Health, 2009. [3] Quality and Outcomes Framework 2013/14. London Department of Health, 2013. [4] Vincent CA, Aylin P, Franklin BD, et al. Is health care getting safer? BMJ 2008;3371205–07. [5] Francis R. Independent Inquiry into care provided by Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust January 2005–March 2009. London Department of Health, 2013. [6] Jha A, Pronovost P. Toward a safer health care system The critical need to improve measurement. JAMA. 2016. [7] Berwick DM. A promise to learn—a commitment to act. Improving the safety of patients in England. London Department of Health, 2013 [8] Vincent CA, Burnett S, Carthey C. The measurement and monitoring of safety in healthcare. London Health Foundation, 2013Archive: Monday, January 30, 2017 at 10:00 am MST / 12:00 pm EST Purpose of the Call: "…if I apply this4/5/2017 7:29:00 PM4472http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Pages/Forms/NewDefaultView.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Tools & Resources4533/25/2009 3:33:37 PM​​​​​​​​​Tools & ResourcesTools & Resources7/27/2017 8:08:17 PM85529http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/enhtmlTrueaspx
Commissioned Research29467/1/2015 1:58:53 AM ​​The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI), along with its funding partners, has commissioned research to develop a better understanding of specific patient safety topics such as emergency medical services, mental health, home care, and post marketing surveillance of drug safety. Click on the links below to learn more about these specific projects. Concise Incident Analysis Method Pilot Study Safety at Home A Pan-Canadian Home Care Study Canadian Paediatric Adverse Events Study Harm to Healing – Partnering with Patients Who Have Been Harmed Patient/Client Safety in Home Care in Canada Safety in Home Care Patient Safety in Primary Care Economics of Patient Safety Patient Safety in Emergency Medical Services Patient Safety in Mental Health Post-Marketing Surveillance of Drug Safety Safety in Long-Term Care SettingsCommissioned ResearchCommissioned Research7/1/2015 1:59:07 AM5306http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/ResearchhtmlTrueaspx
Hospital Harm Improvement Resource27974/14/2015 5:37:10 PMIntroduction Patients expect hospital care to be safe and for most people it is. However, a small proportion of patients experience some type of unintended harm as a result of the care they receive. The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) and the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) have collaborated on a body of work to address gaps in measuring harm and to support patient safety improvement efforts in Canadian hospitals. The Hospital Harm Improvement Resource was developed by the Canadian Patient Safety Institute to complement the Hospital Harm measure developed by CIHI. It links measurement and improvement by providing evidence-informed practices that will support patient safety improvement efforts. The purpose of measuring quality and safety is to improve patient care and optimize patient outcomes. The Hospital Harm measure should be used in conjunction with other sources of information about patient safety, including patient safety reporting and learning systems, chart reviews or audits, Accreditation Canada survey results, patient concerns and clinical quality improvement process measures. Together, this information can inform and optimize improvement initiatives. The Improvement Resource is a compilation of evidence-informed practices linked to each of the clinical groups within the Hospital Harm measure to help drive changes that will make care safer. Through extensive research and consultation with clinicians, experts and leaders in quality improvement (QI) and patient safety, the Improvement Resource is intended to make information on improving patient safety easily available, so teams spend less time researching and more time optimizing patient care. The Improvement Resource is a dynamic tool that the Canadian Patient Safety Institute will continue to develop and review every two years, or as new evidence emerge. If you have any suggestions for the Improvement Resource, please send your ideas to info@cpsi-icsp.ca. The layout of the Improvement Resource reflects the framework of the Hospital Harm measure (Figure 1) and focuses on actions that can be taken to decrease the likelihood of harm. The measure includes four major categories of harm and within each category is a series of individual clinical groups, or types of harm, each of which connects to evidence-informed practices for improvement. For each clinical group, the Improvement Resource provides the followingAn overview of the clinical group and goal for improvement.Implications for patients experiencing the type of harm and their importance to patients and family.Evidence-informed practices to reduce the likelihood of harm. Outcome and process improvement measures. Associated Accreditation Canada standards and Required Organizational Practices and Global Patient Safety Alerts recommended search terms.Success stories from organizations.References and key resources, including guidelines and select research articles.Definitions As patient safety terminology evolves it is important to be clear on the meaning and differences of specific words. For the purposes of the Hospital Harm measure, the following definitions apply Harm – An unintended outcome of care that may be prevented with evidence-informed practices and is identified and treated in the same hospital stay. Occurrence of harm – Harmful event is synonymous with occurrence of harm. Patient Safety – The reduction of risk of unnecessary harm associated with healthcare to an acceptable minimum. An acceptable minimum takes into consideration current knowledge, resources available and the context in which care was delivered weighed against the risk of non-treatment or other treatment. Hospital Harm Measure – Acute care hospitalizations with at least one unintended occurrence of harm that could be potentially prevented by implementing known evidence-informed practices. For harm to be included in the measure, it must meet the following three criteria It is identified as having occurred after admission and within the same hospital stay.It requires treatment or prolongs the patient's hospital stay.It is one of the conditions from the 31 clinical groups in the Hospital Harm Framework. Download Back to Hospital Harm MeasureHospital Harm Improvement Resource Introduction Patients expect hospital care to be safe and for most people it is. However, a small proportion of patients experience some type of10/25/2016 7:23:53 PM5941http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Hospital-Harm-MeasurehtmlTrueaspx
Teamwork and Communication2360Publication;Framework7/22/2009 8:44:35 PM ​​​Effective teamwork and communication are critical for ensuring high reliability and the safe delivery of care. Teamwork and communication techniques can improve quality and safety, decrease patient harm, promote cross-professional collaboration and the development of common goals, decrease workload issues, and improve staff and patient satisfaction. Building effective teams and improving communication through standardized tools will move effective teamwork forward in Canada and contribute to a culture of patient safety. CPSI is developing a Canadian Framework for Teamwork and Communication to help healthcare providers and organizations integrate tools and resources into practice. Canadian Framework for Teamwork and CommunicationAppendix A Teamwork and Communication in Healthcare A Literature ReviewAppendix B Consultation with Health Professionals and Administrators Regarding Teamwork and CommunicationAppendix C Report on Summary of Team Training Programs Download Canadian Framework for Teamwork and CommunicationEffective Teamwork and Communication to Enhance Patient Safety11/9/2016 8:44:39 PM10828http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Incident Analysis2376Framework;Publication4/19/2011 9:12:41 PM ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Analyze, manage, and learn from patient safety incidents in any healthcare setting with the Canadian Incident Analysis Framework. Incident analysis is a structured process for identifying what happened, how and why it happened, what can be done to reduce the risk of recurrence and make care safer, and what was learned. It is an integral activity in the incident management continuum, which represents the activities and processes that surround a patient safety incident. The framework was developed collaboratively by CPSI, the Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada, Saskatchewan Health, Patients for Patient Safety Canada (a patient-led program of CPSI), Paula Beard, Carolyn Hoffman, and Micheline Ste-Marie and is based on the 2006 Canadian Root Cause Analysis Framework. Download To learn more about the framework and the resources available, you can click here to watch the information webinars recorded. The following resources have been carefully selected to support you in implementing the Canadian Incident Analysis Framework. To contribute a resource or to provide feedback, please email analysis@cpsi-icsp.ca. To learn more about the framework and the learning opportunities available click here. Incident AnalysisRoot Cause Analysis (RCA)6/20/2016 3:47:55 PM19754http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Reducing Falls and Injury from Falls (Falls): Getting Started Kit4362Getting Started Kit7/1/2015 8:52:44 AM​ Getting Started Kit This free resource is designed to help you successfully implement interventions in your organization. The Getting Started Kit contains clinical information, information on the science of improvement, and everything you need to know to start using the intervention. Click h​ere to download the Getting Started Kit. ​​ One-Pager ​The One-Pager is a summary of the Getting Started Kit that you can use to promote the intervention to your organization.Click here to download the One-Pager for reducing falls and Injury from falls.​​ Framework for Spread (Appendix N from Falls Getting Started Kit) This appendix contains a description of the seven components of a spread framework along with elements of spread readiness.Click here to download the Spread Framework​​​ ​​What’s New in Falls Best Practice in 2013The one page summary of the changes in the 2013 Reducing Falls and injury from Falls Getting Started Kit. Click here to download the one page summary of “what’s new in 2013” Icons​​​ Intervention IconsUse these intervention icons on presentations, reports, flyers, and other material to promote the intervention throughout your organization.Click here to download the full-colour intervention icon.Click here to download the black and white intervention icon.​​ Intervention Icons With Text Click here to download the full-colour intervention icon with text. Click here to download the black and white intervention icon with text. Getting Started Kit  This free resource is designed to help you successfully implement interventions in your organization. The Getting11/24/2016 10:03:47 PM9278http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResources/Pages/Forms/NewDefaultView.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Events458Events6/4/2015 6:09:31 AM ​​Events9/28/2017 4:15:39 PM31251http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/enhtmlTrueaspx
When being present isn’t enough – Improving patient safety through situational awareness!33087Events9/26/2017 7:41:57 PM Date October 18, 2017 - 10am MT As part two of the Human Factors Call Series, CPSI is pleased to invite you to attend When being present isn't enough – Improving patient safety through situational awareness! This call will focus on one concept in cognitive psychology from the human factors sciences situational awareness. The goal of the call is to familiarize participants with the concept of situational awareness by discussing why you need it and how it is applied to healthcare. This call will also introduce strategies to acquire, maintain and recover situational awareness, thus improving patient safety. By the end of this call, participants will be able toDefine situational awareness (individual and team)Describe one method to acquire situational awarenessList one teaching technique for educating healthcare providers on situational awareness Space is limited, so click here to register now! Register Now Speakers Include Dr. Lisa Calder, MD, MSc, FRCPC Director, Medical Care Analytics, Canadian Medical Protective Association Dr. Lisa Calder is an emergency physician who undertook her 5-year residency at the University of Ottawa. She completed an emergency medicine research fellowship and obtained her Master of Science degree in epidemiology in 2007. Since finishing her training Dr. Calder has also completed two fellowships patient safety fellowship in emergency medicine from the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine and the Emergency Medicine Patient Safety Foundation, and the American Hospital Association’s fellowship in patient safety leadership. Dr. Calder is also a scientist in the Emergency Medicine Research department of the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute’s Clinical Epidemiology Program. She is an associate professor at the University of Ottawa’s department of Emergency Medicine, and has received the University of Ottawa’s excellence in emergency medicine quality and safety award as well as the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians’ teacher of the year award. She joined the CMPA in 2015 as director of Medical Care Analytics. Dr. George Mastoras MD, FRCPC Dr. Mastoras is an Emergency Medicine Specialist at The Ottawa Hospital with a focus on resuscitation medicine. He has a keen interest in the intersection of resuscitation science, human factors, and quality improvement in the context of ED critical care and is engaged clinically and academically in efforts to enhance care during medical crises. He is the Simulation Lead for Faculty Development within the Department of Emergency Medicine, co-director of the TOH ED in-situ simulation program, Chair of the Department's Resuscitation Committee, and is a regular instructor in the Trauma and Point-of-care Ultrasound programs. Dr. Mastoras' academic work focuses on teamwork and human performance during resuscitation and he has published and lectured on a range of topics in ED critical care.Date: October 18, 2017 - 10am MT As part two of the Human Factors Call Series, CPSI is pleased to invite you to attend When being present9/28/2017 5:22:17 PM963http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/Events/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
SHIFT to teamwork, communication and patient safety culture2364Guide;Toolkits7/13/2016 5:21:38 PM Ensuring patient safety remains a major challenge for Canadian healthcare organisations and systems. The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) has been at the forefront of efforts to promote safety in Canadian Healthcare settings and has achieved substantial improvements with the implementation of patient safety bundles. However, there remain substantial challenges to implementing patient safety practices. SHIFT to Safety is excited to announce a new partnership with Dr. Jeremy Grimshaw and the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and provide new resources in the field of behavior change and implementation science to address this issue! Please join us on October 6th as Dr. Jeremy Grimshaw and Dr. Kathy Suh discuss how to take your improvement efforts to the next level by focusing on behaviour change and implementation science. To register for this session, Click hereSHIFT to teamwork, communication and patient safety cultureEnsuring patient safety remains a major challenge for Canadian healthcare organisations and systems. The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) has4/5/2017 7:32:59 PM1312http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx
Canadian Patient Safety Week to celebrate medication safety9737News6/14/2015 7:22:18 AM8/23/2013 6:00:00 AM​​Join us in celebrating Canadian Patient Safety Week (CPSW), October 28 to November 1, 2013. Thousands of healthcare professionals, patients and their families will take part in Canadian Patient Safety Week 2013 by carrying out events and activities related to patient safety in their organizations, facilities and communities. The CPSW 2013 theme is Ask.Listen.Talk, with a focus on medication safety. The Canadian Patient Safety Institute and ISMP Canada have partnered to spread the message of safe medication use. Medication incidents are one of the leading causes of patient safety harm. Consumers are encouraged to avoid harm by keeping a list of their medications and sharing it with their healthcare professionals. Clinicians are encouraged to take time to ensure accuracy in preparing and administering medications to avoid harm. Clinicians can also take part in the National MedRec Quality Audit month of October 2013. To learn more visit the CPSW Medication Safety Page at www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca Register today to receive a free package of posters, tent cards, patient safety magazines and more to support your local efforts. More tools and resources to help you celebrate can be found at www.asklistentalk.ca. Last year, over 1,700 healthcare organizations joined the celebration. Now in its eighth year, we want you to participate as we recognize the great work that is happening to advance safe care. Submit your event ideas and photos to cpsw@cpsi-icsp.ca and we will share them with others across the country. Be a part of Canadian Patient Safety Week! Visit www.asklistentalk.ca to learn more. Canadian Patient Safety Week to celebrate medication safety7/30/2015 8:58:00 PM2271http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/NewsAlerts/News/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Home Care Safety2357Report;Research;Toolkits6/5/2014 8:48:12 PM With the release of the Safety at Home A Pan- Canadian Home Care Study (2013), the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) and the Canadian Home Care Association (CHCA) worked with the research team to translate the knowledge acquired from the study into tools, resources and programs for the field. Click on the following links to access resources available to home care providers, clients and families, and policy makers. Resources for home care providers Resources for family caregivers and clients Resources for policy makers and academics​ Home Care SafetyWith the release of the Safety at Home: A Pan- Canadian Home Care Study (2013) , the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) and the6/29/2016 8:24:53 PM5383http://www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca/en/toolsResourceshtmlTrueaspx