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11/27/2013 5:00 PM

​​How to create a winning video

The votes are in and the winners of the Ask.Listen.Talk. video competition for the best overall video selected by a panel of judges was awarded to “Questionnez Écoutez Parlez-en” submitted by Hôpital Montfort; and the video with the most views on YouTube was “Caring Steps – A BC Cancer Agency Story.” The 10 videos submitted for the competition were unveiled during Canada’s Virtual Forum on Patient Safety and Quality Improvement and are now available for viewing on YouTube. Congratulations to the winners!  Each organization receives a $500 credit at the Canadian Patient Safety Institute Online store.

Maryse Castonguay, Quality Coordinator at Hôpital Montfort  explains that last spring the hospital produced a 10-minute training video with the theme Ask.Listen.Talk. The group TAC com and the continuing professional development center of Hôpital Montfort, le Centre Prométhée, collaborated to create the video, which was then edited to produce the three-minute video which met criteria for the competition. The content originated from a play for staff, patients and families at the hospital. The same professional actors and actresses were then hired to act the parts in a video that could be used for ongoing training purposes. The focus of the video was on communication and reporting incidents, which aligns with the organizational priorities at Hôpital Montfort.

As first time winners, Hôpital Montfort credits their success to leadership support and a challenge by their staff to be creative in their approach to patient safety, rather than always doing the same thing. At Hôpital Montfort, celebrating successes and highlighting patient safety initiatives during Canadian Patient Safety Week is an opportunity to recognize staff contributions and to promote innovations.

Their advice to others?  “Don’t wait for a contest to do something proactive,” says Suzanne Heebner, Risk Coordinator at Hôpital Montfort. “There is a lot of work that goes into preparing a video. You can get a head start by using your existing training videos for competitions.  It is a great way to promote the work you are doing throughout the year.”

The activities during Canadian Patient Safety Week 2013 at Hôpital Montfort focused on the patient.  A patient advocate was invited to present a one-hour lecture on patient partnerships. The staff have already created a video from this presentation that will be used for training purposes, and perhaps even future video competitions.

Tonya Ng, Provincial Medication Safety Coordinator at the BC Cancer Agency, does music, dance and videos for fun. She was encouraged by a colleague to enter the competition and this was the first time that Tonya had produced a video for work. First, she wrote a song and recorded it with a friend. Tonya then recruited 14 of her co-workers to participate and video segments were recorded for 10 to 15 minutes a day over a week. Each evening, Tonya would edit the segments at home and bring them back to work the next day to show those participating the progress in making the video. 

“I wanted to create something that was simple, fun and easily doable,” says Tonya Ng.  “Cancer care is a challenging area to work in and the video captures the spirit of our organization and our patient safety culture. I wanted to make it a positive message in acknowledging the great work my colleagues do in every discipline and also to give hope and courage to the patient that we are here for them. It is a sense of community and working together that brought the video together. The message really resonated with everyone.”

Tonya was touched by the enthusiasm and support she witnessed at every level of the organization, as demonstrated by the cameo appearance of BC Cancer Agency’s president, Dr. Max Coppes. The success of the video was a testament to the positive caring culture at BC Cancer Agency.

Tonya highly recommends that others look at participating in video competitions such as this.  She says it is a matter of finding the right theme and approach and having an attitude of ‘hey, let’s just go for it.’ Tonya is now looking for ways to continue to share the video and show the positive impact of collaborative teamwork on patient care.

The criteria for the 2013 video competition was to promote and demonstrate effective communication for patient, client and resident safety in both healthcare and community settings. Based on the theme, the videos were to embody the values of Ask: good healthcare starts with a question; Listen: good healthcare requires an open mind; and Talk: good healthcare requires a responsive heart.  For more information on the video competition visit www.patientsafetyinstitute.ca